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Gym Intimidation
#1
As you know, I have only recently started going to the gym. I have been avoiding the weight-lifting equipment until last week. I didn't really want to that area because even at 4AM there are big muscle people over there. 

First off, I shouldn't make any judgement just on appearance, these could be some of the nicest people. Yet, male ego makes it easy to get intimidated.

So yesterday we were down there working out and no one was paying attention to use working, which is the reality of it. 

We were getting ready to move over to our last piece of equipment to finish our workout when a big old muscle guy came over and sit down on the machine we were going to head to next (he had no way of knowing we were going there next). 

So we waited as he did his workout on the machine, flexing and grunting. Meanwhile, I'm sitting thinking it is going to be embarrassing when I have to go over and cut the weight in half just so I can move it.   

He finished, so we moved over there and my wife said give it a try where it is at. We had a debate, but she convinced me, so I tried. Low and behold I was able to do all my reps and I didn't even have to grunt like he did. 

Rhonda, in that wifely tone, said "I told you that you could do it".

So thanks to my wife for the encouragement and helping me overcome my own fears.
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#2
Very cool.

Most folks, regardless of their goals, are going to be focused on their own workout if their serious about it.  Which means they just don't have the time/energy to be idiots towards other folks.  You'll get the occasional idiot that yells and screams and puts on a show but that's because they need the attention.  

I'm fortunate to have a full gym right in my garage.  But I've been in many a gym and for the most part never had any issues with goofballs.  

Enjoy the experience, particularly with your wife who is obviously good at being your best cheerleader  Smile
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#3
Good job!

There are 3 components to strength and only 1 of them is muscle size.

There is a Neurological component, as-in how much of the strength you theoretically already possess your CNS will let you tap in to.  If you could access it all, you would tear tendons/ligaments so your body puts on the brakes.  Under life or death, fight or flight, it lets you access pretty much all of it as a lesser of 2 evils.  There are tricks to getting at more of it, things like being more stable (wear hard sole shoes, wrestling shoes, barefoot etc.), and irradiation-squeezing/tensing surrounding muscles.

There is a technique component.  Obviously, if you haven't done an exercise before you can't lift much weight with it even if you are strong enough. You aren't skilled at the lift so your CNS isn't gonna let you tap into a lot of strength on a new movement pattern (and you won't be efficient at the move anyway)  Better technique equals stronger lifts even if no more muscle is added.  I out-threw all the big lugs with the Javelin in High School, I had great technique!

Finally, muscle.  More muscle fiber equals more neural-motor units to do the pulling.  However, fiber is all that matters, muscle can also get bigger due to fluid in the muscle (to carry away waste products) and more capillaries (the "pump") but this doesn't make you stronger.  You get both when you lift, but higher reps with a little lower weight emphasizes the fluid component more, heavier weights with low reps emphasizes the fiber component more.  For example, a classic 3x10 set/rep scheme would build more mass (due to fluid retention) and less strength than simply reversing it and doing 10 sets of 3 reps with heavier weight.
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#4
Right now we are doing 3 sets of 8. When I'ma bale to do all 3 of 8, then I add weight and start all over again.

Making progress, slowly, but making progress. The biggest surprise for me has been the elliptical and how quickly I have been able to improve on it.

The one downside that I didn't realize until I did some reading, when you first start into this, you actually stabilize or even gain a little weight while you are building mass. It now helps me understand why the measurements are important. When I was just dieting, I would see the weight going down every week. Now the weight hasn't gone done, but my belly has gotten smaller.
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#5
(08-28-2017, 06:34 PM)bmyers Wrote: Right now we are doing 3 sets of 8. When I'ma bale to do all 3 of 8, then I add weight and start all over again.

Making progress, slowly, but making progress. The biggest surprise for me has been the elliptical and how quickly I have been able to improve on it.

The one downside that I didn't realize until I did some reading, when you first start into this, you actually stabilize or even gain a little weight while you are building mass. It now helps me understand why the measurements are important. When I was just dieting, I would see the weight going down every week. Now the weight hasn't gone done, but my belly has gotten smaller.

Right, it is all about body composition not weight.  Muscle has about 1/10th the volume of fat so if you added 10lbs muscle and lost 10lbs of fat (staying the same on the scale) you'd look way different!

Muscle also ups your metabolism burning more cals at rest, you have a bigger engine to fuel (like going from a 4cyl to a 6cyl car).  

After a couple months, take a week off and try a completely new routine.
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#6
If you look at this thread: http://sepboard.us/showthread.php?tid=983&page=2

You can see a picture of me before I started the weight loss and a picture of my beautiful wife and me at the gym since I have started working out.
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