Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
How many ways do you need?
#1
I'm setting here wondering how many ways do I actually need to start a fire?

I have regular matchbook matches. I have multiple boxes of strike anywhere matches. I have a box of waterproof/windproof matches. I have a dozen or more magnesium fire starter rods. I have magnifying glass.  I have Bic lighters, Zippo lighters, and various other lighters. I've watched how to start fires using water and a plastic bag. 

The only thing I don't know is how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together unless on of them is a strike anywhere match. I follow 3-2, 2-1, 1-0 philosophy and I think I have fire starting fairly covered. We have store bought tender, we have homemade tender, and I'm old school using just whatever twigs, leaves, and such I could fine laying around I have been able to get fires going. My grandpa taught me about feathering and making kindling (he didn't call that, he just said this is how we start a fire). 

Yet, I'm always wondering if there is something I'm missing that I should know.
Reply
#2
I noticed Flint and Steel is missing from your list. It's a really cool way to start a fire.
Good kit: https://www.amazon.com/Primitive-Fire-De...+and+steel

Quote:
"The only thing I don't know is how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together unless one of them is a strike anywhere match."

I haven't mastered the friction fire yet either...
Reply
#3
Steel wool and a 9v battery.'08.
If you look like food,you will be eaten.


I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.
Reply
#4
Cotton ball and rust or cotton ball and wood ash or fire pistons or parabolic mirror clorine tablet and break fluid pump drill and a board fire thong prison match jumper cables and a car battery with a pencil
Reply
#5
I have steel wool and 9v batteries, guess I should listed that one.

The long list ghost provided I will have to research. Not sure a cotton ball and rust starts a fire?
Reply
#6
Fire is an important aspect of preparedness imo.  Regulating core body temperature, cooking food, disinfecting water, signalling for rescue, defense against animals, psychological comfort etc.  I think it's important to carry a couple of ways to start a fire on your person.  What those two methods are is personal preference.  Important also is knowing multiple ways to start a fire for the 'just in case' situation.  

Look in the DIY section and you'll see my fire-starter wafers and fuel tabs thread.  In this section is my video (that Bob took) on char cloth which is really a cool idea.  Joe (Ghost) has several good threads with interesting ways.  

I carry a Zippo, ferro rod and a peanut lighter on my person and have mini-Bics in my EDC bag.  But I want to know as many ways as I can to get fire started, just-in-case.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#7
(07-25-2017, 02:36 PM)bmyers Wrote: I have steel wool and 9v batteries, guess I should listed that one.

The long list ghost provided I will have to research. Not sure a cotton ball and rust starts a fire?

Here you go

https://youtu.be/GQWYHA76IOs

(07-25-2017, 06:28 PM)ghost Wrote:
(07-25-2017, 02:36 PM)bmyers Wrote: I have steel wool and 9v batteries, guess I should listed that one.

The long list ghost provided I will have to research. Not sure a cotton ball and rust starts a fire?

Here you go

https://youtu.be/GQWYHA76IOs

Here you go ask

https://youtu.be/3RgW7m_j8MU
Reply
#8
WOW, that cotton ball and rust is neat! Never knew you could do that. I'm going to have to give that a try.
Reply
#9
Joe always has the coolest videos. You should see him in person! We got the privilege of having him at a couple of SEP gatherings .
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#10
You only need one - but it has to work!

I am a fan of three:
#1 Bic lighter (too cheap and easy to have to make it difficult - get a few)
#2 Striker. we can argue which is best, bottom line is they all work
#3 KNOWLEDGE - primitive skills are always in style, if a bit effortful. I'm a fan of the little wood boat / friction method. And knowing how to build from starter to kinfdle to fuel is key also!

A little accelerant never hurts either. I generally have some alcohol hand cleanser, some packaged fire starters, and cotton + vaseline, or Davis fire chips.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Make a Fire With AA batteries And a Bubble Gum Wrapper and other ways JRSC 13 4,437 10-16-2016, 11:30 AM
Last Post: David

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)