Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
DIY char cloth
#1
This works so well I thought I'd put a post up here as well as the one in the fire section for those that have never seen/done it and would like to...

Fire from char cloth






We used an Altoid tin.  That way you can make and store in the same container if you want.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#2
I started working with flint and steel last year and agree that the hardest part is making a good bird's nest. I cut up an old ripped pair of denim jeans and used a round tin can with lid (and a small hole punched in the middle) over an alcohol stove and later used an Altoids tin with no hole in a camp fire. Both worked great to make the char cloth, and as David said, you have a storage container as well as a way to make it.

I'd certainly not want to depend on flint and steel over other more modern fire starting methods in a short-term survival situation, but it's nice to know various methods.

Now I'm totally going to get one of those tobacco tins, a freznel (sp?) lens and just for fun I think I might try my old flint lock.
Reply
#3
I used the fluffy stuff that came out of the center of the palmetto bush and it worked great.

The tobacco tins work great.  Waterproof and just the right size.  I use them for the DIY fire-starter wafers as well since they're exactly the right size for the cotton rounds.

Frenznel lens is one of the next ways... Wink
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#4
That's what I really need to work on, plant identification and knowing what can be used when man-made items like cotton aren't available. Very cool!
Reply
#5
(04-10-2017, 01:44 AM)Chico Bill Wrote: That's what I really need to work on, plant identification and knowing what can be used when man-made items like cotton aren't available.  Very cool!


What if you dropped your tin or left it in the fire at the last placed you camped, maybe you had to leave fast?

This guy shows you char from the wild and possibly how it was made/ what it was made from originally:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvSoMe1tQwU
Reply
#6
Nice! I'll be looking for punk wood (I had to look it up) on hikes from now on to try it!

Now, in my very limited experience, whatever a char cloth will ignite (ie: bird's nest, etc.), a ferrocerium (sp?) rod will also ignite faster and easier, but as I said, it's nice to know a bunch of ways to do it.
Reply
#7
(04-10-2017, 04:37 AM)Gene Wrote:
(04-10-2017, 01:44 AM)Chico Bill Wrote: That's what I really need to work on, plant identification and knowing what can be used when man-made items like cotton aren't available.  Very cool!


What if you dropped your tin or left it in the fire at the last placed you camped, maybe you had to leave fast?

This guy shows you char from the wild and possibly how it was made/ what it was made from originally:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvSoMe1tQwU

Very good video. Thanks Gene. Punk wood isn't to hard to find in the woods down here.
Reply
#8
Chared cloth/ chared punk is also awesome stuff for starting fires with the Ferro rod. If you forgot your/ ran out of fire cookies or Vaso-cotton balls, light your char easily with your ferro rod, set embered char into nest, blow to flame...

I use an Altoids tin that Dave give me at one of the Gatherings.
Reply
#9
We made some on one of the SEP gathering camping trips, and it works great.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)