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EMP and flashlights?
#1
Question 
I was just posting in the 'Lighting' section on my current EDC on-person flashlight.  Just got me thinking about how they would fare if subject to an EMP.  These new lights of course have drivers which is what regulates the light.  I wonder to what extent, if any, they would be effected?
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#2
My understanding is that if it has a circuit board of any kind, it's history. It'd be interesting to find out from someone with more knowledge though.
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#3
I'm curious if it would affect the LED on these modern flashlights as well?
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#4
Looking around the net I'm finding as many yes as I am no's.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#5
What little research I have done on this comes up with the same answers that you do.

The largest current EMP case that I'm aware of is the 1989 event. Quebec lost power due to it. Communications were interrupted. Yet long term doesn't seem the storm did damage to electronics on the earth. Reading different articles, part of the speculation why the grid went down has to do with the rocky soil and the inability of the grid to dissipate the energy quickly into the earth.

If you read about the 1859 solar event, things were set on fire and people shocked. Telegraph communications were interrupted around the globe. Yet, there are reports the operators figured out to disconnect the power to their machines and they were still able to send messages.

So how will EMP effect our equipment? Depending on the report you read, it is the end of life. Yet others have pointed out that the equipment we use have become better shielded and more reliable do to the fact that they are exposed to more electrical interface now days and have to be better shielded (if you remember the old car radios where you would get the interference from the electrical system from your car and bleed over to your radio (my car radio would whine up as I accelerated)).

Will you flashlight fail? Most old fashioned switch lights should not, although there is a possibility that they build up enough of a charge that they light up on their own. Will those with circuit boards fail? Maybe. Most flashlights are made of all metal construction. If the flashlight is able to run the charges to ground quickly enough, the circuits shouldn't be harmed.

From the reading it appears that the more wire you have connected to the device the greater the chance of damaging current occurring.

Here is a lengthy article on the subject of EMP and how it effects things: https://www.ferc.gov/industries/electric...-r-320.pdf

I won't pretend to understand everything in the report. One of the things I find interesting is that most of the data and assumptions are based on theories developed from 1960s testing. One in the US and one in Russia. These two test have given the scientist the bases on what they are hypothesizing will happen with a nuclear EMP.

Quote from the article: "It certainty is unlikely that all electronics in the country, or even in any small region,
would suddenly stop in the event of a high altitude explosion. Unhardened modern
electronics, with long attached cables, are likely to be hard hit, and some fraction hurt.
Cars and vehicles might have some failures. Newer ones do depend on a multitude of
computers to work properly, but their cabling is limited in length. It is unlikely that very
small systems, such as an electronic wristwatch, would experience much trouble. "

"As a final note, the bottom line for predicting E1 HEMP effects is that our modern world
has never experienced such as assault. We can try to predict effects and draw upon
similar effects and experimentation, but there is always the possibility of some surprise.
Often even somewhat minor issues have lead to extensive problems in the past, which
would not have been predicted. It is also not known how American society in general
would react if massive infrastructure failures occur over a large region and for a long
time."
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#6
And again - that kind of EMP burst (short of the sun) is only a China / Russia thing.

But - there is always something to be said for simple tech. That old Mag lite is looking pretty good now...
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#7
From what I understand, if the housing is metal it could shield the inner components, unless the inner components use the metal casing as a ground or if not insulated from components- then it's going to be an antenna, collects the charge and may damage the light- this could also depend on the size of the light.

Their are a list of variables that also should be considered = distance, angle, intensity of event or location of flashlight- if it's in a metal cabinet or in a metal building and so on. Until an event happens, we literally are in the dark about a real answer...
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