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So how much water DO you need?
#1
Question 
Good question came up on BLF.  I offered two thoughts;


Quote:1 cup is only 8oz. That’s too low. Figure to equal your weight in pounds to ounces and divide by two. So if you weigh 200lbs then divide 200 ounces in half and 100 ounces is what you need daily. In hot climates and/or high physical activity and/or injury or illness and you’ll likely need more.



Quote:That’s a good question. The answer will vary depending on the study/institution making the recommendation and has to factor in climate, age, activity level, stress level, illness, injury etc. The Mayo Clinic for example recommends (for an adult male in good health in a temperate climate) 3 liters per day which is just over 101 ounces. When I was in the military we were required (in basic training) to consume three 8-ounce glasses of water at each meal before we were allowed to consume food. That was nine 8-ounce glasses per day not counting anything in between meals (where we used 1qt canteens).
One gallon is 128 ounces and is a standard guideline (minimum) for hot climates. Except for two of my years in the military I’ve always been in hot climates (Arizona, Florida and Turkey). A minimum of one gallon was the mantra. Can you do less? Depends on the above factors. In a hot climate, in summer you can lose a LOT of water in just an hour of activity not counting what you lose naturally just breathing and in urination.
It will vary from person to person and those factors but I’d ere on the high side rather than the low side. The old 8 cups a day (which is only 1.9 liters) is considered by many, including the above Mayo Clinic as too low.

Water: How much should you drink every day?

How Much Water Do You Need?
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#2
HYDRATION WATER - IT'S WHAT THE BODY NEEDS
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#3
Hey David, in what context are you referring this to? Out and about or surviving in the wild or is this referring to iwater useage at home?
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#4
Looks to be average usage on a daily basis from the Mayo website.  The army probably considers a fairly high activity level I would imagine.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#5
My official answer:

Critical Information
If it’s already too late: Fill’er up!
Immediately: Stored bottles
Next Steps: Additional stored water
Long Term: Ability to gather/purify , wells, catch basins, large storage capability
General notes about Water

CRITICAL INFORMATION:
You will only last about three days without water. You need to drink 3 Liters a day minimum, without excessive heat or physical activity. This is usually the most important item you need to stock period. Many water systems will stop if the power grid goes down for any length of time, which means no running water in your home. It takes twice that amount if you intend to wash, cook, or do anything else with water.

IF IT IS ALREADY TOO LATE:
#1 Turn the bathtubs all on using cold water – fill them with water and make sure the stoppers are not leaking. Check them often to make sure they are not leaking.
#2 Fill all of the sinks
#3 Turn on the washer and leave the lid open
#4 Fill any plastic or other containers you can find – milk jugs, empty soda bottles, etc…
#5 Do not use any hot water. The hot water heater contains water and there should be a faucet on the bottom that can be used to empty it at the bottom.

After you finish all your water collection, go back and figure out how much water you have and how long it will last. You have that long to figure out where you are going to get more water. Don’t forget that it doesn’t have to be just water. Drink anything that will spoil in the refrigerator such as milk or fruit juice first.

IMMEDIATELY:
Count the number people in your home.
Go out and get two times that many cases of 24 x .5L bottles of water.
Place these in the storage spot of choice.

[pic of the water]

You now have 8 days of drinking water per person. Everyone gets six bottles per day. Wasn’t that easy? Don’t you feel safer already? It’s easy to track consumption, easy to ration, and portable too.

You need 3 liters of water per day to survive. For a family of 4, that means 8 cases of water. At Walmart, these are about $3.50 per case. That’s $28 for to have a week of water on hand. Not a bad investment. If that’s too expensive, get one case per person. Just remember to get another case next month.

This is DRINKING WATER. It is KEEP YOU ALIVE WATER. It is not cooking water, bathing water, wash your hands water, or for anything else. You’ll need more water than that if you want to do those things. We aren’t trying to be comfortable here; we are trying to stay alive. Drinking water is all you really need.

NEXT STEPS:
Make a list of the beverages that your family usually drinks.
Go out and get and get 12 Liters of this per family member.
Place these in a spot where they are easy to access and so you can easily place them in the pantry, refrigerator or wherever you would usually use them.

Here is a small but important note; Water is not the only beverage that will keep you alive when you are in a survival situation! Have you ever been to the store just after a hurricane or blizzard warning? People seem to suddenly think that they can only drink bottled water when these storms kick up. This is absolutely false. In fact, most people don’t drink water most of the time (sad but true). You can survive just fine without actually drinking plain water. Other beverages can even have some advantages over water. Gator/PowerAde is an obvious example, particularly in warm climates. But what about soda? Well, it is generally full of sugar and caffeine. A jolt of sugar and caffeine to keep you alert, energized and ready is not a bad thing in a disaster situation. And also, do not discount the benefits of some comfort food and beverages, along with the variety factor. Two weeks of rice and water is going to put people on edge. Being able to look forward to the meal that will have a soda or some lime aid is big morale booster. The downside of these is that you generally can’t use them to cook with or wash in, or at least you wouldn’t want to.

For example, if your family generally consumes soda or fruit juice, go out and get a basic supply of this and keep it on hand. My family consumes thirst drinks like Gatorade and Power Aid. We play soccer, baseball, ride bike, horse, and other activities in Florida where it gets quite warm. A bottle of this is about 20oz or .6 Liters. They come in an 8 pack, or 4.8 liters per package, so it will take 2.5 packages per person. That means 10 packages for a family of four. These cost about $5 per package. That’s $50. A little more expensive than the water, but again it has some nutritional benefits over water, and is a nice change of pace. And if I need to do any strenuous work or cleanup in the heat, it’s actually better than water.

This will provide you with an additional four days per person. That means that you would now have 12 days of beverages (water and thirst drink) per person. Also, there are some advantages to the thirst quencher in that it has additional benefits for hydration, and they also contain essential vitamins and minerals, and it is flavored for a nice change of pace. Both of these are good things when you may be exerting yourself dealing with a disaster. Get a few flavors.

If you like soda, fine, then get soda. It’s not what I would recommend, but here is how the math for that works. At 12oz per can, times 24 cans per case, that’s 288 oz or 8.5 liters per case. Let’s just call it 9 liters to make it simple. That means 1.3 cases per person for a 3 day supply. So for our family of four, that’s about 4 cases to get through three days.

This next part is very important. It is one of the critical things that separates sensible prepared and forward looking people from those with paranoid delusions of Mad Max Beyond Attack of the Nuclear Contaminated Zombies. I’m going to hammer this point home in this area in every section. You need to make a small change to how you shop. Instead of buying things and placing them directly in the cabinet or refrigerator, you replace what you use from your supply, and you replace your supply from the store. You may say that this requires an extra step, and you are right. My response to that is if you can’t do that you are weak and lazy and going to die anyway, so stop reading this book. The benefits, however, are this: You don’t ever have to make a trip to the store to replace your basics because you will always have them on hand, and you will also have eight to twelve days of drinks on hand for when the worst happens. One small personal habit change, for a huge benefit in personal readiness, as well as great convenience.

So now you have as many days of water as you choose to, or have space to store, and it’s all things you will use anyway. Just replace what you are using! No root cellars stocked to the gills will industrial canned containers, no wacky water collection systems etc…

I will also highly recommend one other tool: The water bob. This is a large plastic bag that sits in your bathtub. You fill it up from the faucet and there is often a small pump to remove water. Great idea. Everyone should have at least one. A bathtub holds a lot of water. This will make it easy to keep clean, fresh, and easy to use. Would that be handy if you get into the “it’s already too late” situation *price of a water bob.

THE LONG TERM

The thing to never forget about water is that “long term” is not very long! I will actually take a moment in this section on water to be a little more seriously. I’m doing this here because when it comes to water, the time you can go without it is really three days. So this is pretty much a constant and ongoing need and the number one survival issue in most situations, and if not number one, it’s a close second. Having water for the long haul means not running out every three days – forever! Never thought of it like that, did you? If you find it a bit scary good, because most of the worlds water supply is dependent upon electricity. And those of you with a well, it runs off an electric pump. If the electric goes out, so will your water sooner or late.

Gather and/or Purify
The key to water in the rather short “long haul” is going to be the ability to gather and purify it. At the end of the day it’s going to be tough to store enough of it without engaging in some ‘out there’ activities. I have one exception to that that I will mention that is also a super stealth way to store a ridiculous amount of water and still lead a normal life., because that is what this book is all about.

First, you need to be able to gather your water. You can’t purify it if you don’t have it. The key to gathering water is to first find a source of it, then to be able to store it, so let’s take each of those first.

Gather - the first step to having water is to be able to get it.

To gather water, you simply need to be able to place it into a container wherever you find it. There are a number of ways you can store water; 1L plastic containers, Gallon Jugs, Plastic bags, Dedicated water containers such as a collapsible water jug. Anything you can get the water into will work. A bucket is a great tool for this. You probably have a couple already.

Purify – the second step is being able to make it drinkable.

Method number 1 - The easiest way to purify water is by boiling it. It’s that simple. Run the temperature up until you see the bubbles, and leave it there for five minutes or so. When it cools, the water is perfectly safe to drink. The key to this method is that you need to have a source of heat. I’ll discuss this under the Fuel section. The main point is that you’ll need a large pot or some other suitable container to hold the water. It would be good if it held more than a gallon at a time. You’ll also need a source of heat. That could be an electric stove, a gas grill or camp stove, a functional fireplace, or fire pit in the back yard. You will also need fuel to create this heat; electricity or the means to generate it, propane, or wood to burn. So while boiling water is pretty easy, it has a couple of additional requirements that are actually addressed in another category. Stay tuned for more on that later. I personally have a Grill, and a Turkey Cooker, with cans of propane, and a camp stove, as well as a fireplace and some stored wood. Anything seem “Doomsday Prepper” about those things?

Method number 2 - The next easiest way to purify water is water purification tablets. These are available in camping shops, outdoor stores, and of course all over the internet. Fast, simple and effective. Just go get some. ** Info on Aquamura etc…

Method number 3 – Another one of those “stealth” methods. Just use chlorine bleach from the laundry room or use pool shock. A gallon of bleach will remain potent for maybe six months, or possibly up to a year. And, it’s great for getting out pesky stains! And of course, if you have a pool, you’ll have pool shock. But you can get pool shock even if you don’t have a pool. This method may not be for the timid, but it absolutely works. ** Great clear instructions for this.

In keeping with our general philosophy, notice how two of those methods require absolutely no extra effort? Basically if you have a pool and a gas grill, you are about as prepared as you need to be for quite some time. Well beyond the FEMA three days rule, more like three weeks or even months.

Large Capacity Storage

Water Barrels

Roof collectors

Swimming Pools

How do I store enough water to last for three months? Easy; I have a swimming pool! It’s a medium sized swimming pool behind my house. It holds approximately 15,000 gallons of water. That’s 56, 781 liters. At 3 liters per day that breaks down as follows:

15,000 Gallons = 56,781 Liters
56,781 Liters at 3 Liters per day = 19,000 days
19,000 Days = 52 Years (for one person)
For four people that’s 4,700 days, or about 13 years

Even being extravagant and using twice as much water as you need, at 6 liters a day, a family of four will still have over 7 years worth of water available in their swimming pool. If you have a pool, I think you are in good shape. I’m not going to get technical about evaporation and other factors involved. Let’s just go with having a pool is one of the greatest water supplies you can have! And here is the really neat part about it: It’s a totally stealth disaster approach! It looks attractive, it’s great for hanging out, barbeques, and parties. If it hot out you can even go swimming in it! Swimming is great exercise. No one will expect you are actually one of those crazy survivalist types. If you have a pool, you win when it comes to water. If not, think about getting one for all kinds of reasons, plus the 10-20k gallons of water for disasters.

One very handy tool is a catch basin of some sort. There are a variety of these, but some sort of 50 gallon drum (usually blue plastic) and a gutter system to collect rain water is a great approach. Now, the key to this is you need enough rain. Assuming that some sudden metrological phenomenon does not occur that turns the Earth into water world, there are not many places where this is true, and even if it is, it isn’t year round.

Yet another approach is a well. If you have a well, that is awesome. Before you get too excited though, I’ll just ask you how exactly the water gets from underground into your sinks, toilets, and tubs? Does it perhaps involve electricity? If so, you may want to consider a hand pump system or option.
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#6
I figured that a gallon a day per person for drinking and cleaning was necessary. I then stored about 550 gallons. It is a start. Adding three 50 gallon drums for tap water that will be our "cleaning" water to go first.
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#7
For cooking/cleaning/drinking I assume 2 gallon a person/per day. Most of my stored food requires a decent amount of water to cook so that bumps my requirement that I impose on myself to 2 gallons. Could I get away with less? Sure. Am I going to bet on it? Nope.
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#8
I have a over 100 gallons stored but know it doesn't last long with 10  9 people ( the heck with my one SIL )


"Just use chlorine bleach from the laundry room or use pool shock"

I packed away in a bucket two of these; Ultima T.K.O. 73% Calcium Hypochlorite, along with a 1 gallon container Cost about $11 each for as much as you'll prob ever need.( they treat 15k gallons each )

The trick here is to mix up your own chlorine, 1 teaspoon of pool shock per gallon of water when making up my chlorine solution.  Then, to disinfect drinking water water, I used 3/4 ounce of my pool shock solution to treat a gallon of water.
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#9
(05-11-2017, 01:29 PM)Tom Mac Wrote: I have a over 100 gallons stored but know it doesn't last long with 10  9 people ( the heck with my one SIL )


"Just use chlorine bleach from the laundry room or use pool shock"

I packed away in a bucket two of these; Ultima T.K.O. 73% Calcium Hypochlorite, along with a 1 gallon container Cost about $11 each for as much as you'll prob ever need.( they treat 15k gallons each )

The trick here is to mix up your own chlorine, 1 teaspoon of pool shock per gallon of water when making up my chlorine solution.  Then, to disinfect drinking water water, I used 3/4 ounce of my pool shock solution to treat a gallon of water.

Today is September 6, 2017.

1.  how much water
     I read the Mayo Clinic recommendations.  Currently, about 20% of your water consumption comes from food.
     In just drinking water, a man or a woman needs slightly under a gallon a day.

When people ask "how much water", they deliberately disregard cleaning - one's body, one's clothes or one's usage in cooking and general cleaning.

I have lived under some harsh considerations so I relate the following.
a.  you can go about a week without bathing before the build up of bacteria and viruses on your own skin become potential, life threatening dangers to yourself.  So bath at least once a week.
b.  you can save on water by having several people use the same bath water.  This is done in many parts of the world.
c.  bath with your clothes on.  Somewhere, I have a picture of myself bathing in north Africa with my clothes on.
d.  store canned foods that do not require water for cooking or cleaning.

2.  water storage and people freaking out whenever a hurricane comes.

a.  store bought water costs at least 300 times the price of tap water.
b.  soda pop bottles are not designed to last more than a few months so you are taking a risk by storing water in them
c.  water is bulky and sold on consignment in super markets.  The bottlers don't have the space or the money to store water and just rush it to the stores.
d.  go to Home Depot or Lowes.  Do you see the paint department?  Go over and turn a paint bucket upside down.  Do you see a number "2" on the bottom?  This translates into the container being "food grade" .   Learn the labels on buckets.  You get a choice of two kids of lids.  One is cheap.  The other is a twist on.  Your choice.  If you buy the $7 twist on, you can use the container to store food and get quicker access than hammering down the cheaper lid!
e.  you are not going to be able to stack flimsy wrapped packs of bottled water from the grocery store.  You can stack the paint buckets from Home Depot or Lowes with no problem.

So you have a choice.  Spend $3.50 on a paint bucket with a hammer down lid or spending a lot more grocery store water.

3.  how do I get purified water.
a.  try to understand that there is a difference between filtered water and purified water.  Most people don't even understand that there is a difference between distilled water and tap water.

So, let's go over the cheap methods.

UN method.  Take a 2 liter soda pop bottle.  spray paint about 1 side with black spray paint.  Fill with water.  Put in sun for a full day.  This doesn't filter out the goop, heavy metals, radiation.  But it kills the other stuff that would kill you.  So, when you pour it out into a different container, run it through a coffee filter and a lot of the goop will be removed.

My method.This gets rid of the step of the coffee filter.
Get two 2 liter soda bottles.  This is what is going to happen.  The slop water is going to go into the bottom container.  The good stuff will end up in the top bottle.  You will still have to leave the unit in the sun for a day. 

Let's review what you already know.  When water is heated up, it evaporates.  So you want to get the evaporated water into another container without contamination.  So, you are going to take a trip to Home Depot.  You have already collected two soda bottles.  You are going to buy stiff plastic tubing with a .75 outer diameter.  You are going to buy 2 foot strips of the tubing.  You need 1 12 inch strip (and you already have figured out that you need to keep more than one unit going at all times).  You are going to drill a .75 hole through each bottle cap.  I don't know the fancy term for the drill bit.  It is the one with the point in the middle, is flat and has the cutting edges on edge of the bit.  To avoid hurting yourself or any surface, do the drilling on a board and hold the bottle cap down with a pair of pliers.  I like the coca cola tops because the black tops with the zero calorie bottle are in two pieces and the bottom falls out with no problem. 

The two soda bottles are going to end up facing each other.  So, the two caps are put on the tubing facing each other and will be glued together.  How much does the plastic tube extend into the lower ikky bottle?  Not far, you want to almost fill the ikky bottle up with water.  This means that the plastic tube will extend high into the clean water bottle.  You want that because the evaporated water will turn back into water.  Ok.  Now for the big moment.  At some time, the upper clean water bottle has filled to a point below whether the water vapor tube is.  You unscrew the crappy bottle from the tube.  The water will not fall out from the clean water bottle.  Now you invert the clean water bottle from the tube.  You, of course, have a spare cap to put on your clean bottle of water.

Now for the mathematics.  How many continuously operating filter set ups do you need for one person?  At least two.  Of course, you don't have a wife/friend/kid.  But you are not getting ahead of what you absolutely must have every day and things fail, so you need at least an extra unit, plus a way of storing the clean water that you don't need.  So, being a belt and suspenders type guy, I have 8 filtration units with 8 extra caps and 8 empty bottles with caps.  Incidentally, you can train a 4 year old to do the task of doing the water cleaning with 5 minutes of instruction.

3.  But I want to get a lot of clean water, cheap

Ok.  Now you are going to do some research.  You are going to start by going to the FEMA website.  There you will learn that there are two kinds of pool shock.  If you get the correct kind, it costs $7 a pound and treats 17,000 gallons of water.
A little bit of the right stuff goes a long way.  So, you don't want to over do it.  Get the measuring devices you need now, not after shtf.  Get the tiny containers to store small doses now and not after shtf.  All good things have a downside.  The downside is that the correct pool shock will eat through just about anything, including your hands.  Do rely upon the packaging when you buy it.  The pool supply store assumes you aren't going to be storing it for shtf.  I end up double wrapping in zip lock bags in snapware clear containers with multiple sets of instructions. 

Ok.  Time to shock the "I read that I only need household bleach/chlorine" preppers.  You think that you are ahead of the game when you know not to use scented chlorine.  Nope, you are still behind the 8 ball.  Read.  Household unscented bleach will start deteriorating after 3 months.  As time goes bye, your stored gallon of household bleach also goes bye bye. 

4.  Doi I have to keep cleaning the water and how do I handle the weight?

a.  Stop bashing Red China.  A battery operated water pump costs around $12.  Make sure that you don't use the same pump for gasoline and for your water.  Make sure that you take the batteries out when not in use.  Do not store the pump in the sun or where you will step on it in the garage. 
b.  You don't rotate water.  You aren't Rocky.  You use your head.  The only way that water goes "bad" is if you have allowed garbage in when you stored it.  So, if you have cleaned your storage containers before usage, you probably won't have a problem.  If it ends up contaminated, just boil it before using.
c.  50 gallons of water stored in an old 50 gallon food container weighs some 400 pounds and more.  You just don't pick it up and carry 400 pounds, even if you are an Olympian.  Just use a water pump and a partially filled 5 gallon number "2" plastic paint bucket.
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#10
(09-06-2017, 02:27 PM)bdcochran Wrote: A few rebuttals/challenges to this - I believe to be an overall excellent post though...

b.  soda pop bottles are not designed to last more than a few months so you are taking a risk by storing water in them
- BS.  Again - I have $20 bucks if you can't put 2L of water in one and have it just fine in  5 years.  

d.  go to Home Depot or Lowes.  Do you see the paint department?  Go over and turn a paint bucket upside down.  Do you see a number "2" on the bottom?  This translates into the container being "food grade" .   Learn the labels on buckets.  You get a choice of two kids of lids.  One is cheap.  The other is a twist on.  Your choice.  If you buy the $7 twist on, you can use the container to store food and get quicker access than hammering down the cheaper lid!
- "Food grade" is not really necessary.  We are storing water....meaning no funky eat through dissolving agents.


e.  you are not going to be able to stack flimsy wrapped packs of bottled water from the grocery store.  You can stack the paint buckets from Home Depot or Lowes with no problem.
- They stack 5 high easy

So you have a choice.  Spend $3.50 on a paint bucket with a hammer down lid or spending a lot more grocery store water.
- 24-35 pack of water is usually $2.99-3.50. And is usable in 12oz increments.  They both have their place.


UN method.  Take a 2 liter soda pop bottle.  spray paint about 1 side with black spray paint.  Fill with water.  Put in sun for a full day.  This doesn't filter out the goop, heavy metals, radiation.  But it kills the other stuff that would kill you.  So, when you pour it out into a different container, run it through a coffee filter and a lot of the goop will be removed.
- No wonder the world is without clean water.  Seriously?  You lost me at UN...

Ok.  Time to shock the "I read that I only need household bleach/chlorine" preppers.  You think that you are ahead of the game when you know not to use scented chlorine.  Nope, you are still behind the 8 ball.  Read.  Household unscented bleach will start deteriorating after 3 months.  As time goes bye, your stored gallon of household bleach also goes bye bye. 
- That's why I buy a smaller amount and use it in my laundry all the time.  Double duty, and steal world use.  Not just a Zombie Apocalypse supply depot store.  I always have some on hand.  Also - 3 months is on the extreme low end too.  It will last 6 easy.  But maybe not 12....temp is a factor.  Indoor lasts longer!  Like in the LAUNDRY room where it belongs.  
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