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Mobile phone in SHTF
#1
Just about everyone has a smartphone ethier android or IOS the trouble is the suckers use alot of power. My phone is a samsung S3 which i bought secondhand and it will run for maybe 2 days with everything turned off gps/wifi etc. 

You can use batterypacks, solar panels or handcrank chargers carry extra batteries yada yada yada.

The solution my group of misfits went with is a second older type phone in our BOBs just swap the sims, remember the days when you only had to charge once a week?  Via our friend with the phone company we bought a batch of Samsung B2100 for £20/$25 each  Battery life: 9 hours talk / 25 days standby, with a spare (from ebay) battery the package weight is 4oz, phone measures 113 x 49 x 17mm nice small light package. It even recieves fm radio and has an emergency batch text message option which is why we chose it.

So if you have an old mobile in the back of a draw it is still useful, just make sure the battery is good.

One thing to remember is if the grid goes down for an extended time or permently for whatever reason most mobile phone towers will run off backup batteries for about 12 to 24 hours with normal service and 24 to 48 hours with reduced power and basic voice and text services all depending on the mast owner not cheaping out on the backups. The smaller hidden repeater masts in signs have no battery backups, for example the service station next to where i work has a repeater mast built into the sign with the fuel prices shown on it. One of the group i belong to works for a mobile phone company here as a maintenance engineer, which is how we know about the runtimes of masts on batteries and other issues.

Some masts will be powered by generators depending on there location, here the police station has a mast for EMS radios and mobile phones and the local authority office also has a mast which is a repeater for for the EMS radios and mobile phones. The most interesting thing about masts that co-locate with EMS radios is that they can have public access to mobile restricted or disabled to extend the EMS repeater networks life.
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#2
Good information and a great idea.  Yeah, phones these days can really suck down a battery with all the bluetooth, GPS, Wifi and surfing youtube while the wife is shoe shopping.  Thank heaven we have youtube while she's shoe shopping though  Big Grin

I also use to have a Samsung S3 and it did last a good long while (I normally didn't use all the extra stuff).  I have an 6S or whatever it's called and it does well on battery, usually a couple of days or more if I'm just talking or shooting the occasional text.  But I like you back up idea and didn't know that in a grid down situation we 'may' have a window of communication.  I wonder how quickly it would become overwhelmed though?
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#3
Look into ham radio,the rules in your country will be different than ours.'08.
If you look like food,you will be eaten.


I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.
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