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Survival vs. Sustainable Self Reliance
#1
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Not really a versus thread, but more a discussion on the differences and similarities.  

I started my prepping out along the lines of survival.  All the common sense stuff;  stocking the pantry, having a means to drink clean water, batteries and defensive tools and supplies.  My thoughts, initially, for survival were to be able to weather through a storm or other natural disaster by having the ability to go for X amount of time without power or other basic services. It also focused on things like breaking down on the side of the road, being able to start a fire, make some sort of shelter etc.  And those are certainly areas to address in a well-rounded prep plan.  As I got more into it I added additional areas to prevent or mitigate various scenarios;  first aid supplies, solar charging, rechargeable batteries, better water filtration systems, car kits, EDC's etc.  Again, important areas.  In this area I don't claim expertise or that I've 'arrived'.  Still on the journey.  

But...

As I've taken on that journey (and still on the path) I've also seen my interests go toward long term sustainable self reliance.  I'd like to begin discussion of that in this thread.  Just touching on different topics that I've taken an interest in as part of my overall prep plan.  If anyone wants to chime in with their thoughts on what they've done along the lines of sustainable self reliance, please by all means sound off.  I'd like to hear what your thoughts are and what your doing.

I'd like to start off on food since I've been working on that as recently as today.

For starters in this area, and as I've detailed in other threads, I am now raising rabbits and quail.  I'm about 7+ months into each.  So again, by no means an expert but I've been gaining some incredible experience.  For starters;

Quail

I started with 6 hens and 2 roosters.  I currently have 28 hens and 6 roosters (with another 4 roosters that are going to freezer camp tomorrow).  I gained the additional quail by incubating the eggs that the original hens produced.  So I learned how to properly incubate eggs and I've gone from a 25% hatch rate to about 70%.  I've had about 4-5 hatches so far and another one within the next couple of days.  So I've learned how to repopulate my flock.  I've learned how to make my own cages.  I've learned how to make my own feeders.  I've learned how to process the quail for meat and of course I've been eating quail eggs.  

Now I'm taking that to the next level.  I've been purchasing quail feed in 50 lb bags from the feed store.  That's worked well and it's not expensive in that a 50 lbs bag is $20 and lasts for more than a month.   But what if for some reason the feed store wasn't there anymore (temporarily or permanently)?  What then?  Well, I've learned how to make both a Black Soldier Fly larvae bin and a maggot bin.  I've set up two of each.  The BSF larvae bin has started to produce and the quail love them!  I just set up the maggot bins so I would expect perhaps a week to see some results.  And I'm using compost waste I would otherwise throw away so I'm getting to recycle it in a proactive way that forwards my prep plan in this area.  My plan is to have these two different set ups produce as much as possible to not only supplement my feed but even replace it (if necessary).  I'll still buy the feed but it will stretch it a lot further the more I produce....for NOTHING.  I put the bins together myself and didn't have to purchase much except some inexpensive plastic bins.  

Rabbits

I've had a couple of unsuccessful kindles but learned from them.  They were due to first time does but I learned that information.  I've had one successful kindle and learned how that works and then learned how to process them.  As with the quail, I buy pellets from the feed store in 50 lb bags.  But starting today I've started working towards alternative sources of food for them.  I'll start with growing rye grass fodder for them (which quail also eat from what I've researched).  I'll have to report back on how this goes.  I've also been feeding them greens out of the garden.

So that's a start to the thread  Smile
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#2
I started my prepping out along the lines of survival.  All the common sense stuff;  stocking the pantry, having a means to drink clean water, batteries and defensive tools and supplies.  My thoughts, initially, for survival were to be able to weather through a storm or other natural disaster by having the ability to go for X amount of time without power or other basic services.


My plans / actions really fall into this category... I do think also tho, a lot has to do where you live.

I live on an Island ( LI, NY ) with a big city as the primary exit route...so most likely a no go that way, prob a bug-in sitiu.

Can't raise livestock or chickens/quail in our over regulated area tho you can get away with rabbits. ( had rabbits with young daughter for years so I have some knowledge ). There's no real hunting available unless you like squirrels and doves.

My main goal is to hit the 6 month mark with survival... esp with the winters here. ( and I think I'm pretty close to getting there ).  Even running a small 100ahr solar system in the shed for electricity ... but, trying diff things still to hit the mark. One thing is still waiting on is a wood stove hooked into chimney as a back up heat source

But will say that skills are what will allow you to keep going if need be as most items do have a finite life.

Now if I could just get the wife to move to the large property I have in  VA. Smile
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#3
Survival is measured in the number of days/weeks/months you can exist with NO outside support from existing systems

Sustainability is measured by the % of your daily/weekly/monthly needs that you can indefinitely provide for yourself.

Example:

A bucket of rice is about preparedness. Eat it for two weeks. No need for anything else - it is gone

A garden can provide X% of your daily caloric needs for some X% of the year. If you have the skills, and soil, etc...It will provide 20% of your total dietary needs for 75% of the year.

One, the other, or both may be best for you. I would like to move to sustainability, but for the time, I'm working on extending survival.
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