Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
.308/7.62x51
#1
As I understand it, they are one on the same round.  From what I've read, .308 is slightly hotter.  Is there any issue with using the 7.62x51 in something like the Savage Axis XP .308 I'm picking up?  From a prepping/stockpiling perspective, is 7.62x51 cheaper overall?  What about accuracy (considering I'm generally looking at 100 yards or less)?  

New caliber and platform for me so I'm looking to get more educated.  So far the only rounds I've picked up are the Win Super X 150g and Perfecta 147FMJ ($18 and $13 respectively).

Also still considering venturing into reloading at some point.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#2
I I see on CTD where I can buy Tulammo in .308 for just under $9/20 rounds.  I don't believe I've ever had an issue with Tula in my pistol calibers.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#3
David, that is a lot of power for 100 yards or less. A 30-30 can do that with a lot less recoil and the same size slug. I had a AR10 in 308 for almost 20 years and I got rid of it because I do not have a place to shoot long distance shooting 800-1100 yards that this round is capable of. I used 147 mil spec surplus initially and reloaded it with 150 grain bullets to get just over 3000 fps with it. With the AR-10 I could hit a nickel 10 times out of 10 at 100 yards. It is a very accurate round with good stability for mid and long range shooting. It is a hard hitting round. 

There is a lot of recoil coming out the Axis XP in the lighter calibers and I would suspect the heavier calibers to be worse. I have a buddy that had the 223 Axis and gave up on it eventually as it kicked hard and had a lot of flex in the pistol grip area. He tried multiple scopes and finally ended up changing the springs in the trigger to lighten it up to about a 4 lb pull to shoot accurately. It also needed to cool between shots as a hot barrel looses it accuracy. Make sure you get the Axis model that has the Acutrigger as there are two designs on the trigger mechanism and this is the better of the two.

To shoot 7.62x51 make sure your barrel says 7.62x51 on it as the 7.62x51 is a much hotter load than 308. You can get Wolf 308 in 140 gr soft point hunting rounds for about 40 cents per round from SGworks http://sgammo.com/product/308-762x51/20-...wpa-made-b You also might want to buy a box of 20 to try out as I have seen some Savage rifles be a bit picky with the steel case ammo.
Reply
#4
Remember this: Once you go metric, you can't go back. .308 ≠ 7.62x51 - same as .223 ≠ 5.56x45

It is NOT just the hot factor of a NATO load. The chambers of the barrels are different. .223/.308 CAN go in 5.56/7.62. 5.56/7.62 should NOT go in a .223/.308


Now - is it going to make a practical difference? Hundreds rot thousands of guys are going to say they have shot 5.56 out of a .223 barrel. I'm sure idiots do it every day. That said - it can go badly….so don't, short of TEOTWAWKI

Always buy the metric barrel, as both rounds will work.

By the way Dave - As cheap guns go…those things are awesome from what I have read. There is a ton of good word on them. I'd feel very comfortable getting one and knowing it would shoot better than me!
Reply
#5
Here's the information I'm gleaning from various websites;  They are almost identical in external dimensions.  They are not identical in internal dimensions and the .308 generally has thicker walls.  Mil spec 7.62x51 is generally loaded hot but the .308 IF loaded to max standards is hotter than 7.62x51 that is loaded to max standards.  Sometimes a manufacturer does not load .308 to the high end.  So it is safe to fire 7.62x51 out of a .308 as the .308 can be the hotter of the two rounds, but the reverse is not necessarily true in that it needs to be a modern 7.62x51 barrel to handle the pressures.  Only other issues I've seen were cycling issues in semi-autos but since the Axis is a bolt rifle that isn't an issue.  

This is what I see as a theme over and over.  

My take home seems to be that I should have no issues with the 7.62x51 out of the Savage Axis XP.  

I know that it's a lot of gun for the 100+/- yard shot, but also wanted a platform for longer should I ever need it.  Plus, hog in Florida can get on the 'hogzilla' side of things so it isn't necessarily a bad thing.  And though I haven't shot it yet, I can't imagine it kicking more than a 12g?
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#6
Ummm think you have that backwards Dave. It would be ok to fire a .308 out of a 7.62 barrel.

It would not be ok to fire a 7.62 out of a .308 barrel.

But as mentioned - likely never a problem. especially with bolt gun.
Reply
#7
Bob has the answer. I looked at the specs on the .308 Axis and it is a 1:10 twist on the barrel. With that much twist you need to stay away from the lighter bullets and go with the heavier weights. My AR10 had 1:11.25 rate and the 150-170 grain was the ideal range for that twist. The lighter the bullet the further it can reach out and that was my objective with that rifle. Basically you will have a spread of weights that will work ideally with the 1:10 twist so a 185gr to 210gr would be the range I would concentrate on. For closer shooting like hog hunting go heavy. If you want range drop down to a 185gr.

The scope that comes with it is the Weaver Kaspa 3-9×40. It is a basic design with a reticle of cross-hairs and a couple of bullet drop notches for distance. I would buy a box of 165gr and site it in at 100 yards and with a cold gun see how it shot 210gr. After it had gone cold again I would check bullet drop at 200, 300, 400, and 500 yards. The scope should be able to reach out that far.

For hunting I would buy the premium bullets. The milsurp cheap (if you call 45 cents per round cheap) is 147gr @ 2700fps will not be as accurate as an 185gr bullet that cost $1.35 per round. I have red some reviews of people getting sub-MOA with 155gr-210gr but they all were either hand loads or premium ammo. I don't think you will be disappointed with the accuracy as the weight of the bullet and powder charge can be fine tuned to make this a very accurate rifle.

And yes it will kick more than a 12 gauge.
Reply
#8
How do you feel about the Perfecta 147g fmj and Win Super X 150g?

Would either be a good or decent round against hog or white tail?  That's pretty much what I'd be hunting for the most part in this neck of the woods.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#9
In modern sporting rifles 308 vs. 762x51 is a distinction without much of a difference. Both have about the same SAAMI CUP ratings which equates to about 62,000 PSI Modern sporting rifles (AR types or bolts and others) are designed for the 308 and therefore can take the NATO round as well. However, some military style rifles like the M1a, FN/FAL, HK91s etc are rated for standard 147 gr NATO rounds which are closer to 50,000 PSI. I've seen more than one bent operating rod on M1As from using a steady diet of heavy bullet 308 ammo in them but I've never seen one blow up. I don't shoot 308 in my M1a but do in my Saiga and AR10 type rifles.

In regards to hunting, I prefer heavier 308 bullets over lighter ones. I like 168gr or heavier but have used 150s on white tail with success. I am sure a 150 gr bullet would work on hogs however. Just make sure you get a soft point or ballistic tip hunting round and not a FMJ or Hollow Points (which in a rifle are typically target rounds not designed to expand)
Reply
#10
I appreciate everyone's input.  New area to learn Smile
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)