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Your advice to someone new to emergency preparedness and/or self reliance
#31
I would suggest that they focus on defense, all the preps in the world cant save you if your dead or they get stolen.
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#32
(08-25-2017, 11:19 AM)Scout Wrote: I would suggest that they focus on defense, all the preps in the world cant save you if your dead or they get stolen.

When I took my CERT class, they broke us into four groups on the first night and we had to list what we would need to survive a disaster. 

I'm not bashful, so I talked to the group and told them we needed four things: rifle, shotgun, and a pistol with plenty of ammo for each.

They thought I was nuts, but that was our list. We got called on first and of course I volunteered to present our list. I read our items and the room was dead quite. I followed up with simple statement that we are going to take everything that are on your list.

The instructor then asked the other groups if any of them had considered any type of defensive items? Not a single group did. He pointed out that it was outside of the scope of the CERT training, but we had just made a very vivid point that with our list, we know controlled every list. He talked some about safety, but the CERT class being a government class left self protection out for the most part.
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#33
Awesome, too true.
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#34
First, understand that there is a difference between self reliance and self sufficiency.

I can not perform dentistry or surgery on myself. However, I can make and do have dentist and doctor appointments this month. I RELY upon myself to schedule routine maintenance on my car, my house and myself.

Second, understand that if something can go wrong, it will go wrong, but you can anticipate some of the failures.

My oven failed after 10 years. It requires two simple parts. I told the "technician" what was the problem, showed him the manual, and then after two weeks of waiting for the guy to order the parts (he had no telephone or computer skills), I then asked my credit card company to reverse the charge, and ordered the parts myself. Moral - keep your manuals, try to obtain professional assistance when needed, and when that assistance fails, have the skills of modern technology to find an alternative.

Starting a year before my factory recommended 90,000 mile overhaul of my car, I researched and started acquiring the parts, OEM where necessary,. Why? Because all of the imported parts are landed in New Jersey, sent out by overnight, and the local two dealerships keep no parts inventories. So, if you think a part is going to wear out, be self reliant and start acquiring the parts yourself.

Yes, I keep a set of computerized manuals for the tools and devices on the computer and the backup as well as having as many as two printed copies so I can get one greasy or destroyed as I repair things. However, I also do a calculation and replace some parts early, like the in line fuel filter on the car (which has no replacement recommendation) or the radiator cap when it generally known to be good for 10 years, has not failed and I am going to keep the car for another 10 years.

Third, understand that dad's skills in WW2, great grandpa's farming skills in the Ukraine are not passed down by genetics. There is a tremendous division of labor in a modern society. When I went into the infantry, I was in shock in my first week. Guys had never been up at 7 am ready to work, didn't know how to make a bed, didn't know how to wash clothes, had never cooked a meal, never shot a gun- much less hunted. I had been an Eagle Scout. The cameo instructor said that a study of Vietnam casualties saw a reduced number of casualties suffered by troops who had the ranks of Star scout or above. You can easily and cheaply check your basic skill levels if you were not a boy scout. Go to thriftbooks.com on line and order a pile of boy scout manuals. If you have never cooked a meal in your life, do the steps to earn the cooking merit badge.

Fourth, never stop learning.
I am retired. When I was a kid, only people who were going to go to college or become a secretary learned to type. So few people learned to type. Now everyone types. I learned how to handwrite before I was in kindergarden. Now it is not taught in the Los Angeles Unified School District. When I started in business, businessmen had secretaries. Now, by and large, they do not. Moreover, the guys who had to dictate to get a letter out, can't exist in many places in business anymore.

I worked with people who vowed that they would never use a computer. I use my home computer everyday to research. This a.m., I ordered a lint screen for a GE gas dryer. Try going down to the local hardware store and doing that!

Of course, I don't have a membership in Twitter, Facebook, SnapChat. I don't subscribe to Netflicks or have a cell phone. You don't have to know and master everything to be self-reliant. All you need to do is ask yourself whether putting the time into efforts/technology/and or money into the latest gizmo enhances your self reliance.
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#35
(07-12-2019, 06:07 PM)bdcochran Wrote: First,  understand that there is a difference between self reliance and self sufficiency.
   
I can not perform dentistry or surgery on myself.  However, I can make and do have dentist and doctor appointments this month.  I RELY upon myself to schedule routine maintenance on my car, my house and myself.

Second, understand that if something can go wrong, it will go wrong, but you can anticipate some of the failures.

My oven failed after 10 years.  It requires two simple parts.  I told the "technician" what was the problem, showed him the manual, and then after two weeks of waiting for the guy to order the parts (he had no telephone or computer skills), I then asked my credit card company to reverse the charge, and ordered the parts myself.  Moral - keep your manuals, try to obtain professional assistance when needed, and when that assistance fails, have the skills of modern technology to find an alternative.

Starting a year before my factory recommended 90,000 mile overhaul of my car, I researched and started acquiring the parts, OEM where necessary,.  Why?  Because all of the imported parts are landed in New Jersey, sent out by overnight, and the local two dealerships keep no parts inventories.  So, if you think a part is going to wear out, be self reliant and start acquiring the parts yourself.

Yes, I keep a set of computerized manuals for the tools and devices on the computer and the backup as well as having as many as two printed copies so I can get one greasy or destroyed as I repair things.  However, I also do a calculation and replace some parts early, like the in line fuel filter on the car (which has no replacement recommendation) or the radiator cap when it generally known to be good for 10 years, has not failed and I am going to keep the car for another 10 years.

Third, understand that dad's skills in WW2, great grandpa's farming skills in the Ukraine are not passed down by genetics.  There is a tremendous division of labor in a modern society.  When I went into the infantry, I was in shock in my first week.  Guys had never been up at 7 am ready to work, didn't know how to make a bed, didn't know how to wash clothes, had never cooked a meal, never shot a gun- much less hunted.  I had been an Eagle Scout.  The cameo instructor said that a study of Vietnam casualties saw a reduced number of casualties suffered by troops who had the ranks of Star scout or above.  You can easily and cheaply check your basic skill levels if you were not a boy scout.  Go to thriftbooks.com on line and order a pile of boy scout manuals.  If you have never cooked a meal in your life, do the steps to earn the cooking merit badge.  

Fourth, never stop learning.
I am retired.  When I was a kid, only people who were going to go to college or become a secretary learned to type.  So few people learned to type.  Now everyone types.  I learned how to handwrite before I was in kindergarden.  Now it is not taught in the Los Angeles Unified School District.  When I started in business, businessmen had secretaries.  Now, by and large, they do not.  Moreover, the guys who had to dictate to get a letter out, can't exist in many places in business anymore.  

I worked with people who vowed that they would never use a computer.  I use my home computer everyday to research.  This a.m., I ordered a lint screen for a GE gas dryer.  Try going down to the local hardware store and doing that!

Of course, I don't have a membership in Twitter, Facebook, SnapChat.  I don't subscribe to Netflicks or have a cell phone.  You don't have to know and master everything to be self-reliant.  All you need to do is ask yourself whether putting the time into efforts/technology/and or money into the latest gizmo enhances your self reliance.

  Good points every one bd, I am currently on your third point reading the scout manual from 1959= it's been very cool and very informative.

.
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#36
Been spending a lot of time with dad as we work on getting the farm back into shape. He was walking me through a lot of old equipment, explain how it works, and what it is used for. Learning lots of tips on how to operate the equipment. As it was pointed out, not passed down by genetics, you have to go out and learn it.
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