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Living in a Cherokee
#1
I'm not indigent but freeing up a few hundred bucks a month to pay off debt is attractive to me.
Is there anyone out there that has chosen to live in their vehicle?
Tips?
Tricks?
Thoughts?
Thanks
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#2
I got paid full per diem up front on a job up in Maryland once and couldn't find a hotel within 50 miles where I was working. two of us slept in the cab of my F150 SuperCab for 3 weeks. We joined a fitness club for $30 for a month to have a place to shower. We made out like bandits on that job.
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#3
This is going to take a while to implement but I already figured out the gym angle. Food should not be an issue. My main deal is storage. I am thinking of renting a small storage facility for clothing, books, and such. Don't really have much furniture, so I would not need a large area at all.
My next concern is staying cool. I live in Nola and sleepy time is going to be torture.
I probably will not do this, but I am thinking hard about it.
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#4
A van would be more um.. comfortable and roomy. The more utility the less conspicuous, meaning you can park just about anywhere and no one knows you live there.
I'd rather not discus my own "extended car camping experience", but alcohol helps with the comfort thing.
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#5
What is the seat folding situation for a Cherokee?  How comfortable would you be?  I'm assuming some sort of sleeping bag or something?

A battery powered fan would go a long way towards cooling.  If you have a way to wet something like a towel or two and hang it up (creating a micro climate inside the vehicle) it would have a cooling effect with the fan.  Wearing a damp T-shirt to bed would provide cooling as well. 

Also, you could easily make one of those DIY air conditioners using a cooler or 5 gallon bucket, some PVC and a battery powered fan.  For a small area like a vehicle it may make a big difference, particularly if you're parked in the shade and of course at night.  A bag of ice is cheap and would probably last most if not all of the night.  A buddy made one as a 'fun project'.  While it didn't really cool the whole room like he thought, a vehicle's interior is dramatically smaller.  And it actually did blow cool air out the PVC pipes. 

Here's just one example of what can be done for cheap:








Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#6
I've done some thinking on the DIY AC while I was at lunch.  My buddies did blow very cold air out the PVC vents.  The guy in the video was blowing low to mid 40's.  I haven't done this myself, but I'd be willing to bet that if you create a micro climate inside your vehicle using towels or something similar that were damp to sort of make walls around your sleeping area while having this pump the cold air into that small area that you'd be quite comfortable, perhaps even cold.  The towels or whatever cloth your using as 'drapes' cool the air around them naturally as they dry.  Add in cold air being pumped into the area would slow the drying process as well as cool the drapes.  I think this may actually work quite well.

This has intrigued me enough to possibly try it at our next SEP gathering using my tent.  I'm hoping for cool weather, but in Florida you just don't know.  I've enjoyed shorts and a T-shirt on Christmas day so there's no telling what the first weekend in November will be like.  Could be cool (very probably not cold) or it could be in the 90's during the day.  If it is warm then the opportunity to test my theory will present itself.  I have a Catoma EBNS with rain fly.  Since this particular trip doesn't require us to hike/bike miles out into the middle of nowhere I would have the opportunity to make and bring a DIY AC.  It would easily fit under the rain fly which can completely enclose the actual tent.  Not air tight or insulated of course but I could easily hang wet cloth on the pole that stretches from one end of the tent to the other under the rain fly.  Zip it all up and see what happens. 

If it performs at least decently in this type of set up then it would work very well inside a vehicle which has more insulation than a fabric tent. 

If I get the chance to do this I'll let ya'll know how it went.  Of course if I do have cool weather then it'll have to wait until one of the gatherings next year when it starts warming up again.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#7
Thanks David, I'm going to keep all your thoughts in mind. As I said, I'll probably never do it but a few well intentioned measures might just get me out of a bind.
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#8
No problem.  Here's a bit of an update.  I worked with a good buddy that actually lived three counties away.  He had moved up there because he had land and could get more house built for the buck than the county we live in.  But it was a pretty far drive to make on a daily basis.  So what he would do is drive his POV which was a pick up truck with camper to work.  He'd park out at the jail and used the gym facilities there for showers and such.  We have an odd schedule where we work for a stretch and are off for a stretch so he's sleep in his camper if he was working the next day rather than drive all the way home.  So in essence he was living in his camper either 2 days a week or 5 days a week depending on the scheduled week.  He used one of those DIY A.C. units in the 5 gallon bucket to cool off the camper and it must have worked very well because he did this same routine for several years, even in the Florida summers. 

I'm going to see if I can try this even before the gathering, perhaps camp out in the backyard if the weather is warm enough to give it a proper test.

Smile
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#9
A cheap cooler should work better than a bucket just for keeping ice longer.

Would the damp towels or t-shirt even work in a humid place like New Orleans or Florida? I assume the theory is cooling through evaporation.
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#10
(10-12-2015, 06:47 PM)Ronin.45 Wrote: A cheap cooler should work better than a bucket just for keeping ice longer.

Would the damp towels or t-shirt even work in a humid place like New Orleans or Florida? I assume the theory is cooling through evaporation.

That's a good question.  Probably be better in a dry heat environment, but worth a shot maybe to see the results.  The cooler is probably a better idea and I noticed he had some sort of Styrofoam lining in the 5 gallon bucket.  I'll look around and see what's available and cheap.

A five gallon bucket with lid is about $5 at Lowes or Home Depot.  I have a roll of Reflex for lining my DIY hammock for cold weather use that would insulate the bucket very well.  Now just looking for a battery & USB fan that would push enough air to make a difference.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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