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What is a BOB, GHB or EDC? What goes in one? And why the heck would I want one anyway
#1
Lightbulb 
The terms BOB, GHB and EDC are prepper jargon for Bug-Out-Bag, Get-Home-Bag and Every Day Carry. They are basically packs or kits that are put together to help prevent or mitigate the effects of events ranging from inconvenient to an emergency. So that answers the first question of what does these acronyms mean.

Let's tackle the third question next, 'why the heck would I want one of these packs or kits anyway? Well, simply put, emergency situations happen to real people every day. No one wakes up in the morning looking to find themselves in a stressful, emergency situation but it happens all the time. Things happen such as storms, fires, mud slides, earthquakes, gas leaks, vehicles breaking down etc. And yet some will comfortably clothe themselves in the idea of, 'it won't happen to me'. That isn't a prudent or practical position to take really when one looks at the situation logically. This doesn't mean we become paranoid, it simply means that we take a few sensible steps to prevent or mitigate any situation that we may happen to find ourselves in.

So what goes into these packs or kits? Well that is the question I plan to spend the most time on in this and subsequent posts. What follows is not an exhaustive list, nor is it meant to be definitive. I live in Florida so some of my needs will differ from someone living in North Dakota though some will be similar. So let's take a look at some items of consideration and perhaps a few tips along the way.


Quote:Tip #1 - Toss an old pair of comfortable shoes and a pair of socks in the pack/kit/trunk. Finding yourself in a situation where you may have to rely on the shoe leather express i.e. your car broke down and you need to do some walking to get to a phone, garage etc could really suck if you're in dress shoes or high heels. Do yourself a favor and have some comfortable foot wear. "But I won't have to walk to a phone cause I have a cell phone". Okay, having a cell phone is a great idea and it can help you out in a LOT of situations. Good thing to have with you. But what if you're out of the service area? What if you're out of juice? What if the situation that disabled your vehicle (perhaps an accident where your car has gone off road) also breaks the phone? These things are a real possibility. And while having a cell phone is a great idea, utter dependence on modern technology isn't a great idea.

There are several very real and serious threats in an emergency situation. Among the top are hypothermia, hyperthermia and dehydration. These three things take out the most people.


hy-po-ther-mia


Abnormally low body temperature, with slowing of physiological activity. Accidental hypothermia can result from falling into cold water or overexposure in cold weather. Hypothermia is serious when body temperature is below 95 °F (35 °C) and an emergency below 90 °F (32.2 °C), at which point shivering stops. Pulse, respiration, and blood pressure are depressed.

hy·per·ther·mia

Elevated temperature of the body (as that occurring in heatstroke).

de·hy·dra·tion

An abnormal depletion of body fluids

Since these are the big three killers, it makes sense that we take some steps to have some knowledge and equipment in order to regulate core body temperature.

Let's take a look at hypothermia (body temperature going to low). And yes, even in Florida this can be a serious consideration as being wet in even 80 degree water over a prolonged period can cause hypothermia (not to mention being wet and in windy conditions). Of course being inside the vehicle, if a viable option can go a long way towards cutting down/out the wind and rain. What else could be tossed in the pack/kit? Here's some options (note that these are examples and I encourage you to price shop around):

Emergency Solar Space Blanket

[Image: Emergency-Survival-Gear-Rescue-Space-Sil...urtain.jpg]

These are inexpensive. As of the writing of this thread you can purchase 12 space blankets on Amazon for $7.29.  Do you need 12?  Well for $7 you have enough to toss into every vehicle (more than one), a purse or EDC bag, first aid kit (FAK), boat or whatever.  Remember, you may not be alone during an emergency and having spares is never a bad thing. 

Emergency Mylar Blanket 52" x 84" - Pack of 12 Blankets

•Rescue Blanket provides compact emergency protection in all weather condition
•Made of durable insulation Myalr material
•Retains/reflects 90% of body heat
•Waterproof and weatherproof
•Size of each open blanket: 54 inches x 84 inches

These blankets can reflect heat back towards your body, or it can reflect heat away from your body (thus helping with hyperthermia and dehydration). Their wind and water proof and can give you dry ground cover. And they can easily be used as a signal for rescue since they are large and reflective. They are incredibly effective and small/light enough to toss in a purse, brief case, glove box, tackle box, back pack or the trunk. Pretty inexpensive insurance.

Another option is an emergency bivy. 

[Image: sol-emergency-bivvy.jpg]

Emergency Sleeping Bag with Drawstring Carrying Bag, Orange






Another option is a fleece blanket. Joann's Fabrics has a pack of two for $30 and they're often on sale for 50% off. Fleece is very warm and I use these same blankets while primitive camping out in the deep woods.

Joann Fabrics link
So here are three inexpensive options that would prevent or mitigate hypothermia in an emergency situation.

More to follow. Smile
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#2
Another inexpensive option to stay warm and dry is a simple rain poncho. You can get a pack of two at the local $ store. The fold up small and light and take up very little space in a pack. Will these last for the next 20 years? I wouldn't count on it. But they'll last you long enough for when you need it.

Alright, let's take a look at hyperthermia (core body temperature going to high). Anyone that has been 'sun sick' or suffered heat exhaustion or heat stroke can tell you it is a big slice of suck. Being properly hydrated is of course the key to not getting dehydrated. I'll look at that in another post. For this one, what are some things that would be helpful in preventing or mitigating hyperthermia?

The emergency space blanket, as noted above, can be an effective piece of gear. So can the ordinary, yet extraordinary cotton bandana. Wet it and put it on the head or around the neck is one good example.

You can get a cotton bandana at Walmart, the Dollar Store or the flea market and they usually cost a buck. Pretty inexpensive yet multi-use piece of gear.





Same thing for something like the Frogg Togg
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#3
Let's take a look at dehydration. Having a good supply of water is key. If that isn't feasible, knowing where to get some water, and more importantly how to make it safe to drink is extremely important. Here are some options to consider:

Have a container. A vast array of options here. Some like a plastic BPA free container like the nalgene

Others like a stainless steel container like the Kleen Kanteen

My personal preference is for the GEN3 Stainless Steel 32 oz. Bottle & Nesting Cup Set.

I prefer a SS container for the sole reason that I can boil water in it if necessary. However, I do use BPA-free plastic bottles as well. I don't like having, using or storing the cheap plastic bottles you buy by the case at the store. The plastic leeches in the heat and I generally don't think the quality of the water is all that high. That's just me, YMMV.

Okay, so now we have a container. Hopefully you'll have some water to put in it. But is it safe to drink? Maybe or maybe not. Things you need to be concerned with are water-borne pathogens such as amoeba, protozoa, parasites, bacterial and viral.

Wiki link

Common concerns would be along the lines of Cryptosporidium or Giardia. These can cause you to loose liquid from both ends to put it nicely. So let's take some steps to disinfect any water source we come across prior to putting it in our bodies.

First, if necessary, filter the water through a coffee filter, bandana, cotton T-shirt to remove as much turbidity as possible. This doesn't make it safe to drink, it just removes some of the visible sediment and funk (if present).

Boiling

At or near sea level, simply bringing the water to a rolling boil will kill waterborne pathogens.

Unscented bleach

2-4 drops of unscented household bleach per quart (liter) of water and leave sit for 30 minutes will disinfect the water to around 99.9%. Colder or more turbid water should have more bleach added or a longer sit time.

Iodine 2% Tintcure

5-10 drops per quart (liter) and let sit for 30 minutes. Not for folks with thyroid issues or pregnant women. You can get a 1oz bottle of this at Walmart for about a buck and a half and it is multi-use as it can disinfect a wound. I pack this in all my BOB/GHB/EDC's.

SODIS





Lifestraws

Lots of different types of lifestraws. The are a straw with a filter attached. Can go from $10 to $20 give or take a bit and can filter 20, 30 even 50 gallons or more and give good protection. I have several of these as well. I use the Aquamira Frontier type as it is the smallest and easiest to pack.

Lifestraw














All of this is inexpensive insurance for safe drinking water. Which goes a long way towards staying hydrated.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#4
Shifting from disinfecting water to the ability to start a fire. Why do we want to be able to start a fire? Multiple reasons; ability to cook food, disinfect water, signal for rescue, warmth to regulate core body temperature, protection (from animals as an example) and simply a psychological comfort. The ability to start and maintain a fire is a critical skill.

Let's talk about tinder for a moment. What can we pack that is light, inexpensive, water proof and will help us to get a fire started with marginal or questionable tinder and fuel i.e. the wood is damp or wet:

Tip#2





Here are the fire-starter wafers that I like to use. They aren't as simple as the cotton ball and vasaline, but they are pretty simple and in my opinion just a bit more waterproof and durable. They are easy and actually fun to make.











Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#5
I don't have an EDC that I actually carry everyday. I do have a travel bag for when I go on trips.
On a daily basis, I'm never far from home or a friendly home. I tend to operate in a fairly small area.
When I'm heading out of town, I'll take a travel bag. It is a Maxpedition versapack.
I keep it loaded with;

Glock 26 with extra mag
Spyderco Paramilitary 2
SOG multi tool
Surefire E2O with 6 extra batteries
Streamlight stylus pro
Bic lighter
12 hour emergency light stick
Cell phone charger
Advil
Rolaids
chapstick
wet wipes
wallet
phone

Outside the bag I have several gallons of water, food, blanket, and raincoat.
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#6
I have a great EDC bag - it is made by 3VGear http://3vgear.com/index.php/packs-and-ba...-pack.html

I consider this my "get home bag" I keep with me in the car. because of it's small-ish size I use it just for that, I only put in it what I will need to get home, even if it has to be an over night trek.

Why you would need one? Just like the boy scouts motto states - "Always be prepared!"
"We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them".
 - Albert Einstein -
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#7
That's a pretty nice bag. Especially for the money.
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#8
(07-14-2015, 10:24 PM)kentguy Wrote: I have a great EDC bag - it is made by 3VGear  http://3vgear.com/index.php/packs-and-ba...-pack.html

I consider this my "get home bag" I keep with me in the car.  because of it's small-ish size I use it just for that, I only put in it what I will need to get home, even if it has to be an over night trek.  

Why you would need one?  Just like the boy scouts motto states - "Always be prepared!"

Good price on that bag.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#9
It's a good idea to periodically check the items in your BOB, GHB and EDC.  As an example, today I checked both vehicles GHB's and found three items that needed battery replacement on a couple of batteries that needed charging.  Also gives me the opportunity to check all the batteries, food and water as well.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#10
(07-14-2015, 10:24 PM)kentguy Wrote: I have a great EDC bag - it is made by 3VGear  http://3vgear.com/index.php/packs-and-ba...-pack.html

I consider this my "get home bag" I keep with me in the car.  because of it's small-ish size I use it just for that, I only put in it what I will need to get home, even if it has to be an over night trek.  

Why you would need one?  Just like the boy scouts motto states - "Always be prepared!"

I want to touch on this again.  The link in the quote is a practical bag at a very good price.  There are manufacturers that make a quality product but charge a very hefty price.  Maxpedition is such a company.  Very good product and I have several of their products.  No doubt they are excellent.  But the are made in the same part of the world as many of the knock-offs I've purchased that have been good products as well and usually at a half or fourth of the price.  So before you purchase a bag or pack, do some price shopping. 

My main EDC sling bag was less than $10.  I've got a couple of EDC belt pouches that were like $7 and $5.  And they work very well and I've had no issues with any of them.  My off-duty fanny pack was $18 when I bought it 20 years ago and is over $100 if you were to purchase today.  Now it's a great pack and has held up to 20 years of use, but I'm glad I bought it for $18 and not $100.

There are great deals out there.  Look for quality and value rather than just name-brand.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply


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