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Different A.O./different issues
#1
(11-09-2019, 05:00 PM)mac66 Wrote: While I was at my cabin hunting my wife called and said the furnace went out and it was cold in the house.  I reminded her that we had a couple kerosene heaters standing by in the garage and a 5 gallon can of kero. Told her to move one of the heaters to the basement to keep pipes from freezing and put the other on the main floor to stay warm. Also reminded her of the two propane heaters and dozen or so 1lb tanks, not to mention the 4 or 5 20#s I have.  She set up the heater in the basement but then the furnace came on then off, then on. She ended up calling a kid (now a man) who was a friend of my sons and used to be in my Boy Scout troop who now owned a heating and cooling business.  He dropped what he was doing and came over. He found out the flame sensor in the furnace we dirty and wasn't triggering the furnace. He cleaned it and the furnace was good to go.

Lessons learned...

1. Even though I have 5 gallons of kero I need at least 2 more cans
2. I need to order another long propane hose, got 1, need 2
3. Having kero reminded me to start filling up gas cans for the generator. I have 3 full cans and about 6 empty 5 gallon ones.


Mac posted the above in the 'What have you done' thread.  It got me thinking about the various and different issues we face depending on where we live.  I've only lived 'up north' for a couple of years but I can identify with a few things you folks normally deal with.  I've lived in a home for a couple of months that had the pipes freeze.  It sucked...a lot.  So when Mac mentioned having to set up a heater in the basement to prevent the pipes from freezing it brought back those memories.  Yet in my area of Florida it's not even something you'd think about.  Same with driving in snow and ice as well as the big equipment used to keep roadways driveable up north.  

Also makes me ponder the fact that if some freak of nature happened and Florida did get a sizeable amount of snow that the place would shut down and things like frozen pipes would become an issue.  

Whereas down here in the summer you always see deaths related to hyperthermia and dehydration.  And you see everyone with a drink in their hand during the summer regardless of where your at.  Just stuff to ponder.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

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#2
It just occurred to me that electric heaters would have worked though I don't think I have any space heaters in the house. Usually the furnace shuts down when the power goes out. In which case I have the kero and propane heaters as back up. I keep meaning to tie the circuit panel to a generator transfer switch but I've never gotten around to it. Ideally the furnace circuit would be on it. We've had several power outages in the winter where we've brought in the kero heaters.

As for the furnace it's reaching the end of its life but we are going to sell this house in a couple years and build a house up north. Probably won't get any more for it with a new furnace than with the old. Even the heating/cooling guy we had out didn't think it was worth replacing at this stage.

Living farther north and out in the country is a whole different thing than here in the 'burbs. You pretty much need 4 wheel drive to get around in the winter as most of the roads/back road don't get plowed or salted. Stores, hospitals and other resources are 10s of miles away. The closest town to my property is 17 miles. The closest gas station/convenience store is 7 miles away. Heat is with propane using 250-500 gallon tanks so you need to be full come fall.
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#3
We have a natural gas wall heater in our basement for a backup for our furnace. The wall heater takes no electricity. It keeps things from freezing and will keep the house livable. We have used it a couple of times during power outages. Since it has its own thermostat, it is set to go all winter long and will kick on even if we aren't home and the power goes out.

We also have a Buddy heater, a kerosene heater, and small propane heater.
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#4
(11-09-2019, 10:41 PM)bmyers Wrote: We have a natural gas wall heater in our basement for a backup for our furnace. The wall heater takes no electricity. It keeps things from freezing and will keep the house livable. We have used it a couple of times during power outages. Since it has its own thermostat, it is set to go all winter long and will kick on even if we aren't home and the power goes out.

We also have a Buddy heater, a kerosene heater, and small propane heater.

When the kids were small and used to play in the basement a lot I considered putting a ventless natural gas heater in the basement.  Had one all picked out then never did it. You know what they say about good intentions.  That was around Y2K and life got in the way.  Still it's a good idea, I even ran a line for one. Wouldn't take much to hook one up.
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#5
Woke up this morning with three inches of snow on the ground in the Detroit metro area. It has snowed all day and continues. We've gotten another 4-5". That's about the earliest I remember this much snow this early. We often get a dusting once or twice in November and sometimes get some snow on the ground in early December.

Of course up at the cabin snow can happen in October so it's not unusual up there. My BIL who lives in Traverse City got 11 inches yesterday and today.

The firearm deer season opens on Friday Nov 15. It's supposed to be 9 degrees on opening morning and in the 20s during the day. More snow is predicted up there for Wednesday. Should be an interesting opener.
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#6
We ended up with two inches of snow, but a layer of ice underneath everything. It went from rain to snow and temps dropped quickly so all the roads have ice on them. Temp is a nice warm 11 degrees out. It is the earliest that we have had over an inch of snow in about 30 years. Most of the time it comes in around the end of December.
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#7
Officially we ended up with 9.5". That's the most snow ever in November.

View of my rain barrels...Looks like more than 9 1/2" to me.

Edited to add...actually they are reporting my city got 10". It's a record for SE Michigan in November.

[Image: pbKMevu.jpg]
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