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What are you harvesting?
#1
I'm an heirloom, open pollinated gardener striving for sustainability.

I just finished harvesting onions and garlic. I've been harvesting Sweet 100, Black Cherry and Rutger tomatoes, Golden Improved wax beans, Burpless cucumbers, Black Beauty Bush zucchini and two varieties of patty pan squash for weeks, but I'm in NW AZ at an elevation nearing 3700' where we can grow food outdoors year round (though last year I had to put up hoop houses over my raised beds).

My second crop of De Ciccio broccoli looks like it may form heads before the heat causes it to bolt. My second crop of Iceberg head lettuce is beginning to bolt as are my scarlett nantes carrots and Red Russian Kale.

I'm learning how to save seed so I allow different varieties to go to seed and harvest it. Funny how steep the learning curve can be for seed saving and how each type of plant requires a different process. Good stuff to learn though.

Though I'm not harvesting any yet my Blacktail Mountain watermelon, Golden Bantam sweet corn and Charantais cantaloupe are all doing well. Tomorrow or the next day I'll start harvesting New Zealand spinach.

Let us know how your garden is doing and any tips you use to increase productivity. Help us all learn by including, if possible, the specific varieties you are growing.
Thoughts are the seeds of actions. Actions are the seeds of fate. Be careful what you plant.
Growing Your Own Food is Like Growing Your Own Money
You are welcome to visit my author website  http://www.RaymondDeanWhite.com
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#2
Here's a list of what we normally successfully plant and harvest:
  • Georgia collard greens (this really grows well in our earth box and we use the leaves in our veggy smoothies) Nice big leaf.
  • Swiss Chard (also for our smoothies).
  • Cherry tomatoes (trying to find the slip with the specific type.  These normally grow really well for us).
  • Yellow pear tomatoes also grow very well for us.
  • Spinach.
  • Romaine lettuce (big producer for us and does a great job of going to seed.  This will repopulate the bed all by itself.  We have some hanging pocket gardens and let the lettuce go to seed and fall into flat trays underneath.  Now the trays are producing). 
  • Grape leaves (two types, the red and white).
  • Eggplant does well for us.
  • Scallions do VERY well.
  • Kale does VERY well.
  • Figs (I LOVE figs.  We do the black mission figs).
Right now I'm priming a couple of earth boxes for the fall planting.  One is devoted to tomatoes and the other normally a mix of kale and lettuces.  We've tried, unsuccessfully, different types of cucumbers.  Just haven't got the hang of them yet.

Very much want to plant garlic and onions such as yellow and sweet.  Any tips you have on those would be welcome.  If I understand correctly, garlic needs to be planted in the fall?

We also do a lot of medicinal plants such as echinacea, spearmint, elderberry, goji berry, hawthorn and all types of herbs.  We also do Anamu plant which is used in South/Cental America as a cancer cure.

We use Miracle Grow and we do vermiposting with red wiggler worms.  I have the Worm Factory 360 with four trays.  I've got probably 2K+ worms in the bin.  It produces really rich worm castings that I use straight in the soil as well as making batches of 'worm tea'.  I have a thread in this section on making worm tea and I'll be adding a thread on the Worm Factory 360.  From all my research and folks I've talked with, worm castings are the #1 fertilizer.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#3
The tomatoes this year did not produce well. Plenty of flowering but the 3 "Better Boy" tomatoes have only produced about a dozen tomatoes.

I built a potato box and just harvested everything in the box. I got about 60 lbs of potatoes. I am going to try this with sweet potatoes next year.

The 5 cucumber plants has produced enough that we have 2ea 1/2 gallon mason jars and 11 quart jars of pickles - I just finished eating one. I have been throwing 2 or 3 into the compost pile every week for the past 4 weeks.

The 2 Bell peppers have done well. I have 6 pint bags of frozen peppers and it has slowed down to producing one every 10 days now.

The Habanero pepper has produced enough I have 2 quarts of picked peppers and it has slowed in production as well.

The Silver Queen corn did well - this was grown on the farm. I put 60 pints in the freezer.

Squash has been a bit of a disappointment. The fancy crookneck has yielded only enough for current consumption. The yellow zucchini has done much better and I have 20 pints in the freezer. The spaghetti squash have all rotted on the vine.

The "Greasy" beans have just come in and I put 18 pints in the freezer.

The field peas did well and I have 20 pints in the freezer and 6 quarts in mason jars. This was also grown on the farm.

The Basil has produced more that we could use. I have also dried enough to fill a quart baggie - more than we will use in a 2 year period.

The Vidalia onions we planted on the farm early this past spring did well. I have about 20 pounds in the basement.

I still need to harvest the carrots and pumpkin. The winter squash is still about 4 foot of vine and should be producing in October/November. The fall romaine lettuce has a good stand and looks like it will do well if the bugs stay out of it.
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#4
(08-29-2015, 04:37 AM)Tsquare Wrote: The tomatoes this year did not produce well. Plenty of flowering but the 3 "Better Boy" tomatoes have only produced about a dozen tomatoes.

I built a potato box and just harvested everything in the box. I got about 60 lbs of potatoes. I am going to try this with sweet potatoes next year.

The 5 cucumber plants has produced enough that we have 2ea 1/2 gallon mason jars and 11 quart jars of pickles - I just finished eating one. I have been throwing 2 or 3 into the compost pile every week for the past 4 weeks.

The 2 Bell peppers have done well. I have 6 pint bags of frozen peppers and it has slowed down to producing one every 10 days now.

The Habanero pepper has produced enough I have 2 quarts of picked peppers and it has slowed in production as well.

The Silver Queen corn did well - this was grown on the farm. I put 60 pints in the freezer.

Squash has been a bit of a disappointment. The fancy crookneck has yielded only enough for current consumption. The yellow zucchini has done much better and I have 20 pints in the freezer. The spaghetti squash have all rotted on the vine.

The "Greasy"  beans have just come in and I put 18 pints in the freezer.

The field peas did well and I have 20 pints in the freezer and 6 quarts in mason jars. This was also grown on the farm.

The Basil has produced more that we could use. I have also dried enough to fill a quart baggie - more than we will use in a 2 year period.

The Vidalia onions we planted on the farm early this past spring did well. I have about 20 pounds in the basement.

I still need to harvest the carrots and pumpkin. The winter squash is still about 4 foot of vine and should be producing in October/November. The fall romaine lettuce has a good stand and looks like it will do well if the bugs stay out of it.

This sounds like a great garden/gardens. I'm severely limited in my gardening space to five 4'x16' raised beds I built. Had to do raised beds because the "soil" here in my part of NW AZ is rock and caliche. 

As an update to my earlier post my Blacktail Mountain watermelons came in but only produced two per plant. They were tasty though and I saved plenty of seed for next year. 

I messed up and left my Golden Bantam sweet corn on the stalk too long (while waiting for the ears to fill out) and it got all starchy so I'm letting it all go to seed and will try again next year. Not much luck with corn here the past two years as last year earbud worms got most of my Country Gentlemen corn before harvest time. I'm beginning to think I need to grow a Native American dent corn for cornmeal and forget the sweet corn all together--just kidding. I'll keep trying until I get it right.

I grew Golden Improved and Gold Mine Wax beans this year. The first picking of each variety was delicious, but I let the second picking get too big and both varieties were tough and fibrous. Learned my lesson and let some go to seed while picking them small (3" or less) and tender. I just pulled all the plants to make room for fall plantings.

My yellow pear tomatoes have been reseeding themselves successfully for four years now but this year the plants that came up we small and runty and didn't produce much so next spring I'll replant with fresh seed in a different spot.

My Mortgage Lifter tomatoes that did so well last year haven't produced much this year and some had blossom end rot which I solved by adding a layer of ground up eggshells to the soil.

The Rutgers and Sweet 100's I grew last year may have crossed. The volunteers that came up this year were prolific, about the size of ping pong balls or a bit larger and they were delicious. They are still out producing our capacity to eat them and promise to keep going up until frost--sometime in November. They're so good I'm saving seed to see if they will breed true next year though I doubt that will happen.

The Rutgers and Sweet 100's and Black Cherry tomatoes I grew in a different raised bed this year performed well. The Black Cherry did especially well and are quite tasty. Sweet 100's are my wife's favorite.

My single Sweet Banana Pepper plant has done a great job this year as have the two California Wonder bell peppers and I've frozen several packages of them both.

Maybe the biggest hit this year were the Short n Sweet carrots (a hybrid, but delicious, and my wife's favorite), Scarlett Nantes (my favorite) and Touchon carrots. I couldn't believe how well the Scarlett Nantes did producing several pounds from one large pot and a couple of 8' rows. A few of them I'd planted last fall went to seed so if I've done it right I'll have Scarlett Nantes and Touchon seed to plant next year as well as this fall. The Touchons didn't produce very well but they were in a different container and the two 8' rows I planted in a raised bed got overgrown by my peppers and marigolds. The ones that came up were very good.

Black Beauty bush zucchini is still producing. I've made four loaves of Blueberry Zucchini bread (so sweet and yummy) a couple of loaves of Applesauce Zucchini bread (also excellent) and I've frozen enough grated zucchini to make a couple of dozen more loaves over the winter. This one plant has produced so much zucchini I've kept my family and four other families nearby supplied. Think I've found my favorite zuke and will save seed from it for next year.

Golden Scallop Patty Pan was excellent this year. I got it from Home Depot and don't know if it's an heirloom or not but I'm saving some seed to try next year and I'll find out. This was the best, most flavorful squash we'd ever tried.

New Zealand Spinach is still going strong after a slow start. It does taste like spinach, even though it isn't. I'm going to keep plucking leaves for salads and cooking until it hopefully goes to seed.

Red Russian Kale is simply delicious and indestructible. It keeps reseeding itself and is a complete winner and keeper.

Red Salad Bowl lettuce bolted early this spring as did my Bok Choy, Iceberg and Romaine lettuces, so I've been eating store bought lettuce this summer and can't wait to put them back in this fall.

I got my onion and garlic sets from Home Depot last fall so I don't know what varieties they are. The garlic did exceptionally well and so did the onions. I let a few onions go to seed and will try them this fall and again early next spring. They do well in the hoop houses I place over the raised beds. 

The Burpee Burpless Cucumber was another tasty and great producer though I only put up half a dozen pints of bread and butter pickles from them. The rest went to neighbors, into salads or into the compost bin. They were highly invasive and crowded out the beans and the Tanja cuke I had planted in that bed. The only things that stood up to them were the kale, New Zealand Spinach and Black Beauty Zucchini.

One surprise was my containers of Detroit Red and Cylindra Beets. They were planted last fall and produced all through the winter and spring. By this summer they'd gone woody but still produced tasty small leaves for salads. I just pulled the Detroit Reds (after saving seed earlier this year) on August 28. The Cylindra (which I also saved seed from this spring) are still producing tasty leaves.

I will definitely be planting both Boule d'Or and Purple Top White Globe Turnips this fall. They basically performed the same as my beets. Both varieties gave me some seeds and both tasted great. This time though I’ll put them in the raised beds instead of containers since I want to grow many more of them this year than last.

Fall plantings this year, many of which are going in tomorrow August 30, will include the above mentioned lettuce, turnip and beets as well as DeCiccio Broccoli, All Year Round Cauliflower, and Mammoth Melting Snap Peas--those peas are so sweet they're like candy. I'll put in some Hollow Crown Parsnips as well. I'm sure I'll find room for I am converting one of my compost bins to a potato tower next year. The potatoes do okay in the raised beds but I can’t really mound them in there so production is very limited. I may try a straw bale sweet potato tower next year also.

I am converting one of my compost bins to a potato tower next year. The potatoes do okay in the raised beds but I can’t really mound them in there so production is very limited. I may try a straw bale sweet potato tower next year also. The experiments continue every year as I attempt to find new varieties that will do well here.

That's it for now
Thoughts are the seeds of actions. Actions are the seeds of fate. Be careful what you plant.
Growing Your Own Food is Like Growing Your Own Money
You are welcome to visit my author website  http://www.RaymondDeanWhite.com
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#5
We are giving away alot,we can't keep up with the canning.We have worked a ton of veggies,we got the late crop in and it's already sprouting.We've got a metric ton of herbs.Been a good cycle,so far.'08.
If you look like food,you will be eaten.


I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.
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#6
My little pepper plants..... Need help lol. The Cajun bells did best of all of them. Over all, I've probably got 10 peppers off it. And more on the way. There's new buds on the poblano, but have only got 1 pepper off it. My jalapeños have put out 3. There's new buds out now.

Lord willing, next year I will do the above ground garden project. I believe that the problem is, is that the plants burn in the sun and aren't "connected" to the ground where they can get better nutrients and cool off. Rather than sit in a hot plastic box in the hot sun.
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#7
Picked up cherry and plum tomatoes last night as well as parsley.  Getting ready for the fall planting.  Hope to make it to the nursery today to get some more plants.  Kale and various lettuces always do well for us.  Normally we get them to seed as well.

Looking forward to it!!!!! Wink
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#8
Picked up two different types of eggplant, couple more different types of tomatoes and some herbs (forgot what I picked up).  Still waiting for my echinacae to come in.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#9
I just finished pulling up all my corn. Wore me out. I swear some of those root balls weighed fifty pounds and were made out of concrete. Anyhow I got them all cleared out of that raised bed and raked it clean and smooth for fall plantings. Two raised bed gardens down and three to go.
Thoughts are the seeds of actions. Actions are the seeds of fate. Be careful what you plant.
Growing Your Own Food is Like Growing Your Own Money
You are welcome to visit my author website  http://www.RaymondDeanWhite.com
Reply
#10
(09-05-2015, 10:28 PM)Author Raymond Dean White Wrote: I just finished pulling up all my corn. Wore me out. I swear some of those root balls weighed fifty pounds and were made out of concrete. Anyhow I got them all cleared out of that raised bed and raked it clean and smooth for fall plantings. Two raised bed gardens down and three to go.

Yep, got two and a half more to go myself.  Hopefully tomorrow I'll get it all done.  It's worth it though and I really love just hanging outside in the garden.  Relaxing and worthwhile. 

Beats being a vegetable sitting in front of the boob-tube!
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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