Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Old batteries-- what do you do?
#1
I have been doing my inventory of flashlights/lanterns and putting fresh batteries in them. This also by default inventoried my supply of batteries of which I am now totally out of except for a few AAs and a few CR123s. Needless to say it is time to buy more batteries. Most of the batteries that come out still have life left in them-- maybe not full potency but certainly not depleted. I tend to keep the old batteries for awhile for a "just in case" kinda situation. What do you do with old, not yet dead, batteries?
Reply
#2
A very good question.

This is what I do - within the context of the overall batteries. I will describe only the common AA batteries.

1. most non rechargable batteries have a life span of 10 years.
If I have radio gear, say a couple of units of FRS transceivers, I store the 10 year batteries with them. Like three setups per unit with a note as to the expiration date. They batteries are stored outside the units in inexpensive PRC clear plastic battery holders.
Now, in my review of range finders/radios/transceivers a few months ago, I found battery packs that had either passed the printed expiration dates or were close to it. Those, I brought into the house. It doesn't matter to me whether I am using "expired" or near expired batteries in devices that are used up. They are used in battery driven units like controllers/flashlights.
I have some 40-50 unit plastic battery cases in the house that I simply mark as expiring batteries.
2. keeping a battery reserve is like paying for care insurance. You hope you never have to use it. However, when you need it, you don't regret the expense.

I will give you a thought. I have three game trail cameras in the backyard. Depending upon the frequency with which a unit is tripped to take a picture, the batteries (rechargeable) will last perhaps 3 months. Each unit takes 8 batteries. So, if I have a pile of near expired no rechargeable batteries and I want to use them up, they would go in a flash. No harm, no foul if one or two of the units die sooner.

Another thought. Buy battery inserts. There are clear battery inserts that allow AA and AAA batteries be used in devices like flashlights that would otherwise take C or D cell batteries. If you do this, then you will have fewer C or D cell batteries to store and keep track of.
Reply
#3
Battery insert, interesting. I am not familiar with this. Where can you find them?
Reply
#4
Concept: being able to use aa batteries (and in some situations aaa batteries) to power devices that otherwise use C, D or 18650 batteries.

I buy off eBay because I sense who are the reputable sellers from the PRC. Another way of looking into it is to go the Battery Junction. ttps://www.batteryjunction.com/search-results.html?keywords=battery+adapters&x=0&y=0

Battery Junction is a reputable US site that does not sell junk. If a product is listed there, you might pay a little more money, but someone knowledgeable at the company buys and sells only quality items.

Please note re 18650 batteries. The standard 18650s might be flat nose or nose type. One version may work in your flashlight and the other might not. Or both could work! I have not yet purchased plastic adapters or inserts for that level of standard battery (takes 3 aa batteries) only because I have a large pile of 18650s that are rechargable. Sometimes the plastic adapter may need to be thick or thin.

However, the aa and aaa adapters are standard and do not vary to my understanding.

Personally, I am no longer buying C or D cell batteries. That means not having to keep track of two kinds of batteries. It also means that you should not have to go through the search functions and expenses I incurred in locating and buying plastic battery holders for unused C and D cell batteries.
Reply
#5
The only issue of using 'used' batteries is using same of different levels...
I have found that if you use in a multi cells unit, 5-7 higher voltage cells and 1 or two lower voltage cells you can have a problem.
Problem arises due to the low cells draining and having voltage forced thru them... it can lead to cell leakage and I have seen this a couple of times.

So, when I save my used cells for a device that doesn't really mind, I always presort them into groups with a voltmeter... they get sorted into ziplock bags by voltage after sitting a day or so off use... since doing so have not seen a problem.
Reply
#6
(10-24-2019, 12:33 PM)Tom Mac Wrote: The only issue of using 'used' batteries is using same of different levels...
I have found that if you use in a multi cells unit, 5-7 higher voltage cells and 1 or two lower voltage cells you can have a problem.
Problem arises due to the low cells draining and having voltage forced thru them... it can lead to cell leakage and I have seen this a couple of times.

So, when I save my used cells for a device that doesn't really mind, I always presort them into groups with a voltmeter... they get sorted into ziplock bags by voltage after sitting a day or so off use... since doing so have not seen a problem.

Thanks! A battery tester is now on my "to get" list.
Reply
#7
I will make a correction. The 18650 converter is supposed to take 3 aaa batteries. For the price of under $6, I ordered 10. I will let you know if they work with either my button or flathead 18650 flashlights.

Why did I order when I purportedly already have a lifetime supply of 18650 batteries. The logic is that if shtf and electricity is not available for an extended period of time, I might be able to use non rechargeable aaa batteries.
Reply
#8
I once saw a Professor not only recharge non-alkaline D-cells but keep them charged for nearly 20 years...wait, never mind.  It was Gilligan’s Island.
Big Grin
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#9
(10-28-2019, 02:35 AM)David Wrote: I once saw a Professor not only recharge non-alkaline D-cells but keep them charged for nearly 20 years...wait, never mind.  It was Gilligan’s Island.
Big Grin

You can do a lot with coconuts.
Reply
#10
Big Grin
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Commentary on rechargers and batteries bdcochran 1 216 03-20-2019, 05:48 PM
Last Post: Tom Mac
  Buyer beware - batteries David 25 11,148 04-04-2018, 02:17 PM
Last Post: Tom Mac
  Check your batteries bdcochran 2 2,118 10-15-2016, 12:51 PM
Last Post: David
Question Ikea Ladda rechargable batteries? David 4 3,389 09-18-2015, 04:07 PM
Last Post: JRSC

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)