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What's in your GHB?
#1
I am about to shift from my summertime GHB to my winter bag. I go from a smaller shoulder bag to a larger daypack/backpack to accommodate additional items of clothing and more food options. I have basic coverage for water gathering/filtration/storage/carry, fire making, lighting, and an IFAK. I do have other things but to my mind those are the necessities. Aside from these items/categories what do you find indispensable for a GHB? Are there any specific tools or items that you have found particularly useful or give you more peace of mind (for instance my Victorinox Swiss Army Knife, an old "Suisse Officer" almost 40 years old-- it has proven itself useful over the decades and even though it is not a constant carry item I would feel at a loss if it were not in the GHB.)

In making the transition of bags I am re-evaluating what I have, what may need to be dropped, or upgraded, or added. Your advice would be appreciated.

So, what's in your bag that you most highly recommend and what is something in it that is particular to you?
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#2
In addition to the main items you’ve mentioned, I like to have rechargeable batteries for my lights.  Power pack with appropriate cables for phone.  Compass.  Eye glass case with lens cleaner.  Those small packs of tissue.  Bandanna.  Rain poncho.  Spare mag.  Multi-tool with extra screw bits.  

I also have a couple of UV Paqlite glostiks attached to the back.  Helps to see it in the dark passively as well as making it visible, if desired, while walking.  

UV Paqlite
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#3
I really should look into a power pack for my phone. That is not something that has been at the top of my list. I actually keep spare glasses in my bag. Not my current prescription but they are better than nothing and being "old glasses" I don't really worry about them. I do keep them in a hardshell case. The paqlites are also a good idea. Something to improve visiblity at night had not crossed my mind. And in a worse case scenario there will be travel in the dark. A Leatherman Wave is part of my EDC. Thanks!

Ok, who's next?
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#4
Walmart has a nice 5000mah digital power pack for $9.99.  Very thin and light.

I just ordered another sample pack of four UV Paqlites.  They have a 20% sale right now.  Ends tonight I think.  Love their product.  Bright enough to read something like a map in the dark after charging them up, with them still visible at the end of the night when you still have your night vision.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#5
One of the most important things is to have patience. You must be prepared to wait hours, if not a few days.

Carry a couple books in the car, a deck of cards, a pen and a pad of paper.

It gives you something to do.

If you assume 1. shtf; 2. you will sling a pack on your back and just take off towards home, you are probably going to be disappointed.
The river cannot be forded for hours; the authorities have established a curfew, there is a fire fight over the next ridge and discretion dictates that you stay in place for an indefinite period of time.

While I don't know your family circumstances, I relate the following for you consideration.
scenario 1:
my late wife worked at mid Wilshire, Beverly Hills, CA. Her boss had a 1 hour commute in the early morning from his home 40 miles away. His wife called and reported a fire was coming over the next ridge a couple of miles away. His family had no plan for the people at home. Wearing a suit and tie, he took off for home - and arrived 5 hours later.

scenario 2.
serious city riot. Son in junior high. He had an escape plan that he implemented while school officials dithered. It included going into the storm drainage system and waiting until after dark.

scenario 3.
I am widowed with no children at home. I am prepared to go into a subterranean parking structure and stay for a week based upon what I carry in the car. I would prefer to spend a few minutes to find a hole to climb into than to go 13 miles across a city and have to deal with new situations on each block just because of a compulsion to go home before it is safe to do so.

I confess that I am a party pooper.
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#6
I have WAY to much stuff in my GHB. It is loaded to the max, which is fine if I will just be waiting out the situation in the vehicle. If I'm having to head on foot, depending on the distance will make what gets carried and what gets left behind. Knowing that the situation can be different depending where I'm at, I have more stuff than I think I will need and can leave stuff if I need to take off on foot.

If I have to make a quick escape, then I grab my EDC bag and go. I have the ability to filter water, make fire, and a couple of emergency blankets in the EDC bag if I had to take off quickly and move fast.

All our vehicles have GHB. Since wife and daughter are usually within a 10 mile radius of home, it is possible for us to get home without much of an issue. I'm generally the one that travels the farthest, which that can be a couple hours from home visiting job sites, but my vehicle is setup where I could stay in it for a few days if needed or I have GHB to start walking if needed.
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#7
If the GHB is kept in the vehicle, a good fleece or wool blanket is always a plus as well. I got a bunch on nice individual fleece blankets from Big Lots and Walmart years ago. Very inexpensive yet they work like a charm.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#8
(10-18-2019, 02:29 AM)bdcochran Wrote: One of the most important things is to have patience.  You must be prepared to wait hours, if not a few days.

Carry a couple books in the car, a deck of cards, a pen and a pad of paper.

It gives you something to do.  

If you assume 1.  shtf; 2. you will sling a pack on your back and just take off towards home, you are probably going to be disappointed.
The river cannot be forded for hours; the authorities have established a curfew, there is a fire fight over the next ridge and discretion dictates that you stay in place for an indefinite period of time.

While I don't know your family circumstances, I relate the following for you consideration.
scenario 1:
my late wife worked at mid Wilshire, Beverly Hills, CA.  Her boss had a 1 hour commute in the early morning from his home 40 miles away.  His wife called and reported a fire was coming over the next ridge a couple of miles away.  His family had no plan for the people at home.  Wearing a suit and tie, he took off for home - and arrived 5 hours later.

scenario 2.
serious city riot.  Son in junior high.  He had an escape plan that he implemented while school officials dithered.  It included going into the storm drainage system and waiting until after dark.

scenario 3.
I am widowed with no children at home.  I am prepared to go into a subterranean parking structure and stay for a week based upon what I carry in the car.  I would prefer to spend a few minutes to find a hole to climb into than to go 13 miles across a city and have to deal with new situations on each block just because of a compulsion to go home before it is safe to do so.

I confess that I am a party pooper.

Good points! You are right, situations can and in all likelihood will be worse, and having a plan is key. Actually multiple plans if we are honest. A plan means that we have thought through possibilities and thinking through the possibilities is what drives what we choose to put in a GHB. Understanding the makeup of our, for lack of a better term, area of operations guides us to some of the unique things that we might want to have at hand. My area is much more apt to have me in a rural or small town setting; someone in an urban environment/larger population base will have some very different concerns to meet. And the bit about your son-- I am truly impressed!

Oh, and whether or not you are a party pooper remains to be seen.

(10-18-2019, 11:50 AM)bmyers Wrote: I have WAY to much stuff in my GHB. It is loaded to the max, which is fine if I will just be waiting out the situation in the vehicle. If I'm having to head on foot, depending on the distance will make what gets carried and what gets left behind. Knowing that the situation can be different depending where I'm at, I have more stuff than I think I will need and can leave stuff if I need to take off on foot.

If I have to make a quick escape, then I grab my EDC bag and go. I have the ability to filter water, make fire, and a couple of emergency blankets in the EDC bag if I had to take off quickly and move fast.

This is part of what drives my choices-- take off quickly and move fast. There are items that reside in my vehicle that may or may not be added in-- it would depend upon what has actually happened, where I am in relation to home, and what kind of time I think it will take to get home.

(10-18-2019, 05:38 PM)David Wrote: If the GHB is kept in the vehicle, a good fleece or wool blanket is always a plus as well.  I got a bunch on nice individual fleece blankets from Big Lots and Walmart years ago.  Very inexpensive yet they work like a charm.

Yes, I have decided that I do need to add a blanket of some sort. I do have some spare sleeping bags of which one could easily be tasked to the car. One scenario for me is unexpected snow/ice (look up "snowpocalypse" or "snowmaggedon" for Georgia). This is also the scenario that is most likely to occur because it has. For those from more snowy climes please remember that most southern municipalities do not keep the type, or volume, of equipment for road clearing. We don't keep snowchains in our trunks, we don't put snow tires on come winter. And these events frequently have an ice component-- it is very rare that what we get will be strictly snow from beginning to end. Ice and freezing rain is usually how these things begin. The 2013 snowpocalypse was, according to all the weather forecasts, just going to be a few short lived snow flurries that morning. Yeah, right.
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#9
(10-18-2019, 05:38 PM)David Wrote: If the GHB is kept in the vehicle, a good fleece or wool blanket is always a plus as well.  I got a bunch on nice individual fleece blankets from Big Lots and Walmart years ago.  Very inexpensive yet they work like a charm.

We keep a sleeping bag, a spare jacket, and 100% polyester blanket n each vehicle.
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#10
Wow...in my "Bag" - without opening it let me see...

* Important note: I have BOTH a survival pouch and a bag. If with the car and SHTF happens;

Pouch (Maxpedition wallet size): Swiss Climber, Survival purification straw, water purification tabs (3), Small Bic lighter, striker/flint, fire starter tinder, Flashlight (Gerber exec - waterproof), Paracord bracelet, compass, whistle, Ibuprofin, anti-diarrheals, bandaids, condom, nylon knee hi. Also have a Gerber Armor 4" flower with that.

Main Bag (Maxpedition Jumbo): 1 Liter Nalgene bottle (full), Water purification tabs (12), Metal cup, water flavoring pouches, Large Bic lighter, wet tinder fire starter, Dave's fire chips, water proof matches in sealed container with striker strip, Innova N5 flashlight, 2 glow sticks, 2 CR123's, Brunton 1.5x recharge for my phone, Gerber Wave multi-tool, Hand sanitizer (alcohol based), sunscreen, bug spray, head net for bugs, small poncho, heat sheet bevy, space blanket, Adventure Personal Medical Kit, Tasco 8x monocular, compass, Paracord (50m), pad & pen, Super glue, plastic baggies/rubber bands, More paracord, Fishing Kit, and that's all I can say from memory.

Also - if leaving car I'll likely have a Sipik light, a Surefire G2, another Swiss army climber, and 2 more liters of water. I also have a set of Frog Tog pants/top available for rain, a blanket and an anorak, and skull cap. I have food bricks and also and additional medical gear. I have another 2x recharge for my phone.

In the Jumbo would be my Walther PPS with 24 rounds of 9mm (3 mags).
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