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Oil changes
#1
I taught my son how to change the oil in his car.  We've been using a full synthetic oil for a while now on his car and while it's $40-$70 to get it done somewhere it's less than $20 to DIY.  And I think it's important to at least know the basics for vehicle maintenance.
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#2
I last did my own oil change in about 1972. Why not since that time? Working and didn't have the time; moving and had no room to store additional equipment. I would feel more comfortable working under a lift. Now, I only drive under 5000 miles a year.

I also have my mechanic do other things while under the car. Last time, I had him lubricate the seals and change the differential fluid as well as change the inline fuel filter (replaced after 15 years and 107,000 miles). A couple of years ago, I had him paint under the car where some brand new tow truck operator would know where he could safely lift the car. The days of lifting by the fender or bumper are long gone, but don't count on a newbie to know that when all he has seen is old time movies on television.

My kid (40 years old) is capable of changing his oil and doing brake jobs.

Everything is so specialized today to the point that I end up focusing on getting the necessary parts instead of doing the work.
1. A toyota avalon takes a specific brake fluid. There was a suit because people replacing the brake fluid simply used Dot 3. Two dealers did not have it in stock. I had to order through eBay.
2. A Honda civic took a proprietary transmission fluid.
3. When I wanted the best brake pads on the market (beyond factory), the local auto parts store did not have them and I bought off eBay. Either the car or I will die before the newly installed brake pads wear out.
4. I wanted to have the Mass air sensor cleaned if necessary. Required special fluid which I had. Turned out that it did need to be cleaned after 107,000 miles.
5. I wanted the choke inspected. Another special fluid. Turned out it was ok.

Things change. You can remember the days of inch measurement fasteners. I finally broke down and bought a metric plastic assortment because that is what is used today. I always take the box in when I have servicing.

Other important things to know. You cannot core the modern radiators because they are made of plastic. It doesn't matter that I used to routinely rotate tires before air impact wrenches were used to secure wheels. It also doesn't matter that my dad used to let me take apart the carburetor and boil it. It is more important to know which mechanic will run the computer diagnostic for free and advertise such.
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