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What is your Martial Background?
#1
So, if you are looking for information on MA of some sort, who is you go to person on the forum for that topic or style?

I have studied/practice the following:

#1 Tai Chi Ch'uan - the martial art, not the health and beauty style.  I have practiced/studied it as such since 1989 so I guess 30 years at this point.  I have practiced exclusively Yang style, however, know multiple forms of it including Yang Cheng Fu's Large Frame 108, William Chen's small frame 60, Chen Man-Ching's 37, and my original medium frame 108 learned from a student of both the Yang Ban-ho and Yang Chen Ho lineage, medium, small and large frames.  I he also studied and competed in push hands, as well as Da Lu, and learned the fighting set from 3 different teachers, three different lineages - the best one being a student Yang Shao Ho's.  In addition I have studied quite a bit of Chi Na, and sword and saber.  

#2 Xing Yi Chuan - this is another internal art but much more, shall we say, Yang than the Yin of Tai Chi.  Here we have the 5 fists, the 12 Animals, the combination styles, and an assortment of partner forms etc.  Also have studied staff.  Probably 10 years of Xing Yi, including a little competition, altogether.

#3 Northern Shaolin - I have studied up to what would be about an Orange (mid) belt .  I do this mostly for the workout and to remind myself why I like the internal styles.  Currently spending some focus here and going to formalize my belts, and reduce my belt size!

#4 A smattering of other internal styles including Ba Gun and Ba Ji, and a little of this, that and whatever...

#5 Okinawin Kobudo - I spenty a couple of years exclusively working Staff, Nunchaku*, Sai, and Tonfa at a Shorin Ryu school in the late 90's.

#6 Iaido - I am self-taught .  Much like Shaolin, this is something I studied to learn the difference between Japanese and Chinese approaches.  

* I have an extensive background with shall we say "informal" and "Self" training with the nunchaku.
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#2
My background comes from watching Kung-Fu Panda 1, 2, and 3. Still working on mastering the pinky grip.

So, besides those three movies, my background is zero. My daughter took a years worth of something and she earned a couple of belts, but I will be honest it was when I was working nights, so the wife took her mostly and I had very little interaction with the class.
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#3
(02-07-2019, 11:46 AM)bmyers Wrote: My background comes from watching Kung-Fu Panda 1, 2, and 3. 

Do not underestimate the ability to disarm with humor...
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#4
The only Black belt I have is the one that holds up my gun..
tho do have some training in control of person via defensive hand holds
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#5
Started studying the marital arts (specifically Karate) in 1975.  Started teaching in 1986.  I had my own school for about 7 years where I was the head instructor (I taught in my off duty time).  I've been very honored, blessed and privileged to learn from some very solid instructors with name recognition in the martial arts community.

As far as credentials:
  • 9th Degree Black Belt in Kong Soo Do Karate
  • 6th Degree Black Belt in Taekwondo (combat TKD not the fluffy sport TKD)
  • 5th Degree Belt Hapkido
  • 1st Degree Black Belt in ShuriTe Karate
  • Police D.T. Instructor
  • PCR Instructor
  • SPEAR Instructor
  • Boatman Edged Weapon Instructor
  • Israeli D.T. Instructor
  • Israeli Instinctive Shooting Instructor
  • Police Firearms Instructor
I've taught high liability professionals (LEO, Corrections and Security) both on and off duty as well as private citizens, Woman's SD courses and CCW classes.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#6
Been a student of they arts for 38 years currently my Ranking & experience are as follows:
8th in Kong Soo Do (instructor)
5th Combat TKD
3rd Hapkido
Chin Na practitioner
Krav Maga
Edged weapon offence & defensive skills
Israeli instinctive shooting

Also was in Partnership in a Dojang with David for 7 years teaching LEO, Military, security & some general public..
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#7
I started in Kenkojuku Shotokan in '71, and soon discovered one of the instructors had fought on one of Japanese Kickboxing Teams before Americans had to move to Japan in order to continue fighting on a team. (My instructor was a contemporary of Ray Edler, and shared a room with him at some match.) Muay Thai was hard training back then and complemented my training in shotokan. After a while I ended up becoming interested in some Chinese styles, including some of the lesser known variations of Mantis, Snake, Crane and Dragon styles, which is where my primary interest remained throughout the years. I still keep both a white and a black belt from my earlier days, to remind me where I started. I haven't taken on any private students since about '96, and the last one inadvertently resulted in me feverishly writing hundreds of pages of thoughts on my arts experience. It began as a project I'd initially considered presenting to that last student, as a possible outline for him to use to pursue his studies, but it kept going after I'd decided to cut him loose. (It runs close to 1400 pages last time I looked, but that also includes some thoughts I was journeying toward the end of the 90's regarding my "apprenticeship years" as a firearms instructor. I really need to start sorting it all out.)

I became a LE firearms instructor in '90 and served in that role, even after my regular retirement, until eventually deciding to take a sabbatical from teaching at the end of '16. I continued to update and take various armorer classes, though, and when I finally organized all of them a while back I found I'd acquired 26 certificates for armorer classes/recerts. I've done it long enough to have acquired a passing familiarity with some of the different guns involved. Wink I still get calls asking for help about both firearms training issues and repair/maintenance, but I haven't decided if I'm interested in diving back into doing it again on a more regular basis.
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#8
Martial arts. No certificates. judo/ san so/Escrima/folder knife/kukri knife/sword/even fighting with an entrenching tool. I am way past the time when I would grapple with people. I stopped san soon when I ended up in Kaiser for a week on morphine. Fortunately, most the of movements are the same in the different martial arts disciplines because they are based upon a knowledge of human ergonomics.

So now I am at the stage of limiting my martial arts to doing Argentine tango. What? When you do a martial art, 1/2 your time should be spent receiving a blow and 1/2 the time delivering a blow. You need to know how a person will react, right? In tango, you do not use upper body strength. You use balance, movement, orientation and knowledge of how the other person will react.
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#9
I started studying martial arts in 1985. I have had varying degrees of training in taekwondo, aikijitsu, hapkido, shorin-ryu, okinawan kobudo (staff and nunchuku), and (if we include western approaches) boxing and wrestling. As for certifications, I am a 3rd dan in kongsoodo, a first dan in chang hon taekwondo, and a certified SPEAR coach.
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#10
Nice to see you Conrad Smile
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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