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Advanced applications to basic line drills
#1
High Block:


[Image: age_uke.gif]

For the purposes of this thread, the term block will be used to represent a widely used and recognized term for purposes of reference.   In the diagram above the arm is raised in front of the torso to at or above the head in order to block an incoming attack often represented as a downward hammer fist strike.  That can be a possibility for a force-on-force response.  It can be a deflection combined with proper foot work to take you out of the path of the attack and redirect the incoming strike.

It can also be used as a strike such as an upward forearm strike to the upper body of an attacker while in a close-in position such as a clinch.  Further, if you examine the diagram I chose for illustration you'll note in the last picture that the right hand is chambered on the right hip while the left arm is blocking a downward or straight-line strike (could be either).  That chambering of the right hand could be in preparation for a counter-strike.  But examining it in more depth, that hand could have a grip on the attacker (his limb, belt, coat, shirt etc) and by bringing the hand back into your center of gravity you cause the attacker to become unbalanced (not represented in the illustration).  Simultaneously while you've grasped the attacker and drawn him into your center of balance, thereby unbalancing him, you deliver an upward forearm strike to further unbalance him and damage him.

And additional use of the high block movement is a shoulder lock.  Again, examining the last illustration the left arm is intercepting the attacker's right arm.  If the defender then places his right arm up and behind the upper arm of the attacker (on the outside) he could then apply an effective shoulder lock. 

[Image: hqdefault.jpg]

Example in action:





Several things to consider just from this one basic movement. One could literally spend multiple classes training this one movement in a variety of situations.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#2
Low block:

[Image: 17C.jpg]


Often taught as a defense against a kick.  I submit that this is not the most effective (or practical) interpretation for this movement.  First, if depends upon the type of kick that attacker has committed to doing.  This requires that he either telegraphs the kick sufficiently for you to know what he's doing or that you read his mind.  Given that, for a straight kick you may be able to pull if off, but if it's a side kick, especially from someone that is using his shin (rather than instep) you're going to find yourself in trouble.  A shin kick puts the attackers shin against the radius bone in your forearm.  I don't like your chances on that unless you've done a LOT of hard body conditioning.

A more practical interpretation is that it is a strike.  One such strike is illustrated here:

[Image: low%20block%20pic_full.jpeg]

[Image: hair+Grab+Rear+Hammerfist+Final.jpg]

No, these pictures don't look exactly like a perfectly executed line drill.  And that's the point.  The line drill, by nature, is uniform.  But a fight is fluid and chaotic.  Both you and the attacker are in a state of constant motion.  That has to be taken into account.  So the line drill teaches a specific pattern of movement i.e. a strike using a hammer fist.  But the execution can take many forms/angles depending upon a variety of factors.  The point is to use the hammer fist to strike a target in the lower half of the attacker.  That could be the groin, the knee, the inside of the thigh or any appropriate target that stops the attacker or sets him up for an appropriate follow up.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#3
Palm Heel block:

[Image: hqdefault.jpg]


I wasn't able to find a better illustration, but that actually works out fine.  A palm heel 'block' is often taught as pictured above where the student is basically standing flat-footed and there is no dynamic energy in the movement.  After all, it's just a warm up line drill right?

Perhaps not.

Looked at more in-depth, it makes for a pretty good strike.  Imagine the attacker has grabbed your shoulder or is pushing you back into a wall.  That's a pretty good set up for him to follow up with a punch using his other hand.  But the palm heel movement offers a couple of options.  One is to strike the inside of the attacker's outstretched arm if you wish to remain on the inside.  This could remove the hand from your person and perhaps even offer the attacker some pain/injury depending on where you struck.  And it could easily set you up for follow up strikes on the inside such as the hammer fist listed above.

Used on the outside of the attacker's arm (above the elbow), keeps you away from his other hand.  This can lead into escapes or control holds such as an arm bar as appropriate to the situation.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#4
Inside Forearm Block:

[Image: 3184013-130505041052.png]

Again, this can be viewed as a simple line drill or even a block.  It would be a highly inefficient block with a low % chance of being used against a determined attacker.  However, it can (and is) used as an arm bar to move someone (or place them against the wall) or arm bar takedown.







Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply


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