Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Examples of why one should always be armed in the woods
#31
Had to rinse out his waders after that.
Reply
#32
(11-19-2015, 01:43 PM)David Wrote: I was just talking with my brother the other day.  He's on 26 acres out in the country.  Last week while walking out to the hen house he was charged by a Rotweiller that had wandered from the wooded side of his property.  He figured it was about 130lbs.  He almost always has a gun on his hip while walking his property and today it was no different.  Except rather than carrying his .38 or 9mm he tossed on the 6-shot .22 revolver.  Not his best choice but at least it worked.  The first round was rat-shot so that was useless.  He figured he hit the dog at least 3 out of the next five shots.  It was enough to turn the dog around and he ran off. 

I suggested to him to make sure it's the .38 or 9mm from now on.  He's used his 12g or AK numerous times to dispatch varmints and rabid animals on the property.


Just talked with him last week.  He was telling me that he's shot something practically everyday for a week or so.  Mostly varmints causing damage to this or that.  Had a coiled up rattlesnake on the path from his house to the shed one day.  Don't remember what he popped it with but he took care of it.

Got me thinking about something specifically for the woods.  Currently if I go out I have my Glock 23 loaded with either 165g PDX1 or 180g FMJ (for the penetration).  The G23 is the most 'oomph' I currently have in a handgun.  And while not a bad choice for my area (main concern is a rabid animal) I've been thinking about snake as well and looking into snake shot.

I was originally thinking a small .38 snub like a Taurus M85 and having the first couple of cylinders loaded with some snake shot.  In the 'regret' thread I mentioned getting rid of a Ruger GP100.  Started thinking that maybe getting back into a .357 wouldn't be a bad idea for a woods carry gun.  Still load the first couple of cylinders with .38 snake shot but could have something heavier in the other cylinders like maybe some sorta 158g LSWCHP or maybe find a 180g load somewhere.  Something heavy for the caliber.  Still tossing it around.  A little .38 would be lite and ideal for snake and small stuff but a .357 would cover more bases.  While a .44 might not be a bad choice it may be somewhat overkill maybe.  And those are generally more $ than a used .357.

Still pondering...

I suppose I could look into snake shot for the Glock 23 but don't know if I'd trust it beyond the first round in the chamber.  Don't know how reliable it cycles and would hate to find out it doesn't do well if needed.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#33
Don't run snake shot in a rifled bbl, it messes up the twist. Shotguns are better for it, smooth bore ect.'08.
If you look like food,you will be eaten.


I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.
Reply
#34
David, shot rounds rarely cycle semi's. You would have to manually cycle to the next round.
Reply
#35
(06-11-2016, 01:36 PM)Ronin.45 Wrote: David, shot rounds rarely cycle semi's. You would have to manually cycle to the next round.


Yeah, that's what I figured.   Sad

Really sounds like a good revolver would be the best thing to go with.  Probably should have hung on to a good revolver when I had one!

Tongue
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#36
(06-11-2016, 07:42 AM)kirgi08 Wrote: Don't run snake shot in a rifled bbl, it messes up the twist. Shotguns are better for it, smooth bore ect.'08.

Most shot cartridges for pistols use plastic capsules to hold the shot until it exits the barrel. Even without the shot capsule lead pellets may lead up the rifling but won't hurt it.
Reply
#37
And you've got to figure you're not going to be shooting that much snake shot anyway.

Brothers tossing around the idea of getting a Taurus Judge in .410/.45LC.  That's not a bad idea.  Still considering a good .357 as a viable option.  It would have to be a good Taurus though as I can't touch a good S&W around here unless I'm wiling to fork over some serious bucks.  Except for that one Taurus 66 7-shot that became very hard to pull the trigger I've had good experiences with Taurus revolvers and pistols.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#38
(06-12-2016, 02:18 AM)David Wrote: Brothers tossing around the idea of getting a Taurus Judge in .410/.45LC.  


My brother and his eldest son went to a local gun show and he did indeed buy a Taurus Judge.  This has become his favorite carry gun while walking his property.  He said he's already 'judged' a squirrel (which he's been having a heck of a time with and other nuisance animals).  

Looking at several YT videos it really does have a lot of potential at close range.  In one video, the shooter was using #4 buck which has 9 pellets.  From 7 yards he patterned all 9 pellets on a man-sized target with about an 18 inch spread.  From 12 yards he had 5 of the 9 pellets on the same sized target.  Each #9 IIRC is about .24 caliber.  I don't know what the penetration would have been at either distance, but as far as number of pellets that isn't too shabby.   The 250g .45LC wasn't a slouch either.  

So for a woods gun, this isn't a bad way to go at all.  Bird shot would more than take care of snakes and small varmints.  Buckshot, slug or .45LC on larger threats like a rabid animal.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#39
Last weekend I was out checking the trail cameras which is typically uneventful and always fun. I was on high alert as this is the time of year the Moose are dropping calves and about the scariest creature I've run across is a cow Moose with calves. About 100 yards from where this picture was taken the dogs both had their hair up and were side by side barking.  

[Image: IMAG0019_zpswmd6j0cb.jpg]

I saw a brown streak crashing through the brush, circling to my right. My first thought was a young Moose but as he broke cover I saw it was a yearling Bear.  Not a big one, 125 pounds tops.  He stopped just up the hill from me, pausing long enough for me to snap a picture of him. Unfortunetely it's not a good picture but my other hand was filled with my Single Seven.

[Image: 1-Yonderosa%20052-001_zpspgvoa3tu.jpg]

He wasn't aggressive but very curious.  I drove him off by waving my arms and shouting, not wanting him to be too comfortable around humans or dogs for his own good.

The most common run in I have with wildlife is with Coyotes.  I have a dog that seems to be a magnet to them. So far she's escaped with only minor injuries. My revolver has only been used to get the Yote's attention as when they are battling a shot would be too risky.  Upon hearing the report the Yotes skiddattle at warp speed and so far I haven't had a safe second shot at one - that rule about knowing your target and what is behind it comes into play when they are in your driveway and the neighbor's house is in the background.

a cropped picture from my game camera
[Image: 1-Yonderosa%20fork%20084-001_zpsf25hqi5s.jpg]

My policy is that I'm the visitor in the woods and I won't mess with their tribe if they don't mess with mine.

A Single Seven, 327 Fed Mag isn't my first choice for big critters but I feel comfortable with it and packing along a few boxes of ammo weigh a lot less than my 45 Colt does so should an opportunity to do some plinking arise, and it nearly always does, I can. Also 32 S&W (Long) and 32 H&R (mild loadings) are quieter.  During hunting season it is legal to take Grouse with a centerfire firearm so I'll load five 327's first in the rotation and have some 32 H&R small game/plinkers five clicks of the cylinder away should the opportunity to extend a dinner invitation to them.
Reply
#40
Just to keep this thread going. I've carried a Snake Charmer in the front hatch of my ATV for years. It is a miniature .410 one handed shot gun. I have slugs, buck and bird shot with it and it also hold 4 shells in the stock. Good for critters and I have taken grouse, rabbits and squirrels with it along with an occasional porcupine, mouse and raccoon.

They don't' make them any more and it is significantly smaller than other single shot shotguns.

[Image: IMG_0627_zps85d8f657.jpg]

[Image: IMG_0626_zps9d39fb57.jpg]
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
Exclamation The Armed Citizen David 45 18,343 12-12-2018, 04:37 AM
Last Post: Bob
  The Armed Citizen - A Five Year Analysis David 2 163 10-27-2018, 09:57 PM
Last Post: Ronin.45
  Woods carry: .40 S&W or .357sig? David 26 2,166 06-12-2018, 01:33 AM
Last Post: David
Thumbs Up Armed citizens defending themselves David 4 2,676 08-13-2015, 01:00 PM
Last Post: kirgi08

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)