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Examples of why one should always be armed in the woods
#11
Quote:We have had a couple of stray dogs visit the property. Fortunately, they were the nice kind, but it gets you thinking.

In fact, the only times I have ever drawn my sidearm have been to deal with possibly dangerous dogs. On two occasions, the dogs were all bluster. On the other, while walking at night, the pitbull that came my way was chained up, fortunately for me, but it rattled me for sure.

With that said, in broad daylight, as in 10am on a Saturday morning, my next door neighbor capped a hungry Bobcat trying to get into his chicken coop. It was a pleasant summer day and I was changing the oil on my Jeep about 75 yards away at the time.

My point: Crazy things happen at the darndest times and sometimes from the oddest or seemingly unlikely threats. Another reason to always carry, no matter how bright the sun is shining.

Now I am thinking I should add a weapon light to my shotgun.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#12
Quote:I've probably more than once told the story of when I was a teenager, out rabbit-hunting with a blackpowder CVA Kentucky rifle that I made from a kit in the early 70's; wintertime in Michigan. Was on our farm property and didn't bring any handgun with me; all I had was the long, heavy cap & ball rifle in .45 caliber. While out, I saw a pack of probably 7-8 dogs off in the distance, headed roughly my way. We were an hour or so north of Detroit and had a regular problem with people dropping off their pets in our area.

As I changed direction, so did they, staying on course to intersect me. Now I was a big farm boy and like most teenage males, probably had an exaggerated sense of my own capabilities; but I knew that a blackpowder single-shot and a knife was a bad match for a half-dozen hungry dogs, regardless of how immortal a teenage male may think he is.

There were no trees nearby, not even a fence to back up to, so the second time they changed direction to keep match with me, the decision was made on my part. When they were probably 40-50 yards out, the lead dog (a big black mix) changed from a walk to a lope at me. I shot him, dropped the long, unwieldy rifle next to me and pulled my knife. At the gunshot and the black dog rolling over, the others changed direction and ran off. I reloaded the rifle & went straight back to the house; didn't even ground-check the dead dog. That was the last time I ever went hunting with only a single-shot BP gun.

All that to say this - that was during relatively good economic times. It was before the Jimmy Carter "malaise" years while Detroit was still living high on the hog, and the problem was created by people simply tired of taking care of their pets & turning them loose.

If things ever got really bad on a large scale - not Mad Max bad, just Argentina or Greece bad - the problem could be orders of magnitude worse, and turn into a city problem instead of just a country problem. Rover may be somebody's best friend today, but he's also a pack-oriented carnivore with a hunting instinct and doesn't like being hungry any more than anyone else does.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#13
Hiker Killed by Grizzly Bear in Yellowstone National Park
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#14
Quote:Here is another "after dark" farm story experience with large carnivores. Back in the late 70s when I was in the 8th grade, I was raising a calf on a bottle and penning it up in the barn at night down the road 2 miles where our family farm is located. It was a Friday night and my parents and older brother were at a high school football game and for some reason I didn't go. We didn't have AC back then so we always had the windows open when it was hot and ran the attic fan at night when it was really hot.

I was sitting in the living room and heard what sounded like a woman screaming back towards the barn, and knew immediately what it was. We used to have a panther come through there screaming like that several times a year, so I figured it was sniffing the barn to find a way into my calf. I got up got my .22 Marlin lever gun, a handheld spotlight (one of the big plastic ones with the button and handle on top), got my dogs and went down there. It quit hollering and we never saw anything, but the dogs stayed close to me the whole time. You could tell the dogs didn't like what had been down there, but they were standing with me against it.

When my folks got home, I told them about the experience, and my dad was mad at me...not for going down there to shoot a panther, but for not taking enough gun. He told me if it ever happened again to take a shotgun. I agreed, and in hindsight, realized later that I should have hunted around and found one of our headlights that we used for coon hunting as well, but I was a 13 year old kid and just did what I thought of at the time.

I saw a panther at dusk in the back of the place while deer hunting in Jan 2010 and my wife and niece saw it (or one just like it) while riding in the mule with me in March of that year, near where I was trapping. There are some large animals back there behind that place.

Here is a trailcam picture of a large male bobcat that I got back in 2012 near a deer feeder that morning, and a picture of a mature whitetail doe taken the same day in the evening standing in the same spot.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#15
Many years ago I went deer hunting one afternoon with my Dad's trusty 30 Carbine lever action. I sat in my tree stand and had a huge boar hog walk out beneath my stand. There is no season on wild hog and with the noise this one was making there was no chance of seeing a deer that evening. Being young and dumb I tried to shoot the boar in the head. I soon learned a 30 carbine bullet will ricochet off a hogs head and really piss off a hog. The boar got mad and tore my stand out from under me, I climbed into some of the branches. I had only carried 5 rounds with me and I had shot all 5 at the boar. I spent the night on a branch in that tree.

I learned a few important lessons:
1) A 30 carbine is not the weapon of choice for hog hunting. I graduated to 30-06 for deer shortly thereafter.
2) Carry more ammo than the capacity of your weapon. I only loaded 5 as I had never needed a second shot for deer when using a rifle.
3) A handgun could make a good backup. I have since carried a 44Mag when I go hunting.
4) Sitting in a tree all night on a branch makes for a long night.
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#16
(08-10-2015, 11:13 PM)Tsquare Wrote: I learned a few important lessons:
1) A 30 carbine is not the weapon of choice for hog hunting. I graduated to 30-06  for deer shortly thereafter.
2) Carry more ammo than the capacity of your weapon. I only loaded 5 as I had never needed a second shot for deer when using a rifle.
3) A handgun could make a good backup. I have since carried a 44Mag when I go hunting.  
4) Sitting in a tree all night on a branch makes for a long night.

That's worth a re-popst, good advise!
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#17
Quote:Speaking of cougars and 'enuff gun...

This past summer my family went camping here in Virginia at one of the national forest campgrounds. It is fairly isolated, out of cell range, but realistically not too far off the beaten path. I always pack a 9mm whenever I venture out, and certainly whenever I camp. Before going, I thought to myself, "Self--Maybe I should bring the shotgun, just in case."

And then I was like, "Nah. You are being a hypochondriac. It won't be necessary." Or so I thought. But unknownst to me, my crystal ball was not functioning at peak capacity.

Fast-forward to 2:07 AM. I wake up with a feeling that something in the forest just isn't right. It was a very visceral bad feeling. Wife and kids are sleeping. Dog outside is silent as a ghost.

Then this bird, practically right next to our tent, starts a very noisy conversation with its friend across the campground. This goes on for like 10 minutes. However, I couldn't shake the feeling that something was wrong. The bird, while problematic, was definitely not it. Finally, the two birds shut up and seconds later I hear this heavy dragging sound.

Now I am thinking. "WTFIT? That's no bear. That's a mountain lion!"

Then, I begin to wonder if I am being hyper-delusional, so I wake my wife and make her listen, not saying what I think. At the same time, I am beginning to think that the shotgun would have been a very good idea, especially when my wife says, after we both hear a gutteral growl beneath the dragging noise, "It sounds like a tiger!"

We were on the fringes of the campground, where it abuts the wilderness. We pull out a light and shine in its direction and everything stops. Better to go on offense. (Maybe?) The sound returns shortly thereafter and then moves away. I then happen to notice my bad feeling is gone and all is right with the world again.

After speaking with the camp hosts and local campers, no one heard anything that night. No one suspects "cougar." Several days later, I began doing some research and checked out a youtube compilation of sounds from mountain lions and what I found sent a chill down my spine:

The dragging sound sounded exactly like the labored breathing of a mountain lion. I asked my wife to listen and she about turned white.

Virginia's DNR website states that while the Eastern Cougar has been declared extinct, unconfirmed sitings have since been reported up and down the Blue Ridge.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#18
These are the reasons one must know the possible threats they may encounter in the wild not just the likely ones. Every time someone asks what they should carry as a woods gun the first question is "what woods?".
Around here the biggest threat would be a wild dog or possibly a small black bear. In Montana the threat could be a bit bigger.
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#19
Around here are foxes/yotes/bobcats and bears.There are wolves way west of us and if a situation occurs they may come east looking for food.My woods pistol is a g20 loaded with dt 200grn hard cast.my rifle is either and fn/fal w/5rnd mags only,or my pss if I'm hunting bambis daddy.'08.

I believe the "cougar" story to be a myth,they have been sighted and photoed in e/tenn w/nc.
If you look like food,you will be eaten.


I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.
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#20
We've got fox, black bear, pack dogs, panther and the odd rabid variety of varmint.  A rabid animal would be my chief concern, with two-legged predators a close second.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply


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