Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Making Knives this weekend!
#1
I have been watching you tube videos about knifemaking and cheap and easy home forges. I finally just bought all the stuff and I'm heading to a friend's shop on Saturday to give it a try.   I may video it, just for the heck of it.

I'm excited and nervous that I don't screw it up, but making a knife by hand is one of those life bucket list things of mine.  We shall see!

Interestingly, the actual STEEL isn't expensive. But, I had to pick up a bunch of tools (grinder, fire bricks, etc). I really have no interest (or space) to make knives to sell, but I probably will give some away as presents.

I'm also going to attempt Kydex (which was really cheap) for sheaths. I've done a fair amount of leatherwork but I got rid of all of my tools.

I'll post updates. Tonight (while watching Walking Dead) I've been sketching out blade designs on graph paper.

We'll see what happens!
Reply
#2
If you do a video I'd love to see it.  Making knives and sheaths and holsters is really a useful, not to mention cool skill(s) to have.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#3
Definitely post some pics / video, it sounds interesting.
Reply
#4
This is the guy that I've been studying.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifTIuNt3aNY


Outdoor55

He has 4 really interesting videos of note
-How to make a Miniforge
-how to improve a miniforge
-how to make a knife with just an angle grinder
-tricks to heat treating

Couple of notes.

The company he links to the fire bricks is out of stock of them and the shipping sucks anyway. Amazon has them, but they are $15 EACH and you really need 3 of them (top, bottom and back). I got 4, since they tend to crack and I wanted a spare.

I watched another video on how to make Kydex sheathes, which is a simple but tool intensive process. You need a band saw, drill press, belt sander, heating pad, etc. Not really something to do in a Mad Max situation, but kydex was really cheap from the place I ordered it from, so I figured what the hell.

If you already have a tool shed, you probably have most of the stuff. I live in an apartment, so I have really nothing. I'm sort of loading up on Harbor Freight stuff just in case. While I do think that you COULD make it with just an angle grinder, I bought a bench grinder also. Harbor Freight had one for $35 and there was a 25% coupon this weekend. Worst case, I'll return it

The thing I'm most concerned about is the handle. I don't have a drill press nor does the place I'm going to. I've done other projects not unlike this and the ability to drill straight vertical holes has always eluded me and I dislike paracord wrapped handles

1/8inch steel is a lot thicker than you think it is and 3/16' is REAL thick. A becker BK2 is made with 1/4, so it's got to be a beast.

Something that they DON't show on Forged in Fire is the tempering process. Making a blade isn't just heating it and dunking it, you have to re heat it AGAIN to soften the blade so it doesn't shatter. That's a 4 hour process in the oven at home.

http://www.knifemaking.com/ is where I got my stuff. I think the prices were pretty good, but the shipping was high ($18 flat). So, if you're going to buy stuff, buy a lot of stuff to make it worthwhile. The actual blade blanks were not expensive... about $10 for an 18" piece, which should be enough to make two.


We'll see how it goes!
Reply
#5
I'll post some more details later (and hopefully some pics and videos)

Man, it was a lot of work. Even with power tools and bar stock, it was a couple of hours of grinding just trying to get the bevels in some sort of reasonable shape.

Also, learn to read the labels on your tools. After grinding away with an angle grinder and switching between cut off wheels, grinding disks and flap disks, I finally realized at the very end of the day...... that I was using the fine grid disks. When I changed down to the 30 grit from the 120 grit, it was magically different.


To recap my process:

Bar stock, I made a design on graph paper, (knocked off an Esse CM6) put masking tape on the bar stock, transferred the designs, rough cut them with an angle grinder cut off disk, the ground down to shape with various disks. I would alternate in with a hand file now and then just to even things out. An angle grinder is a chain saw, not a chisel. So the file would help me touch up certain areas.

Then I made the forge out of fire bricks like in the videos. I had a propane torch but it never seemed to get hot enough. So my buddy pulled out his acetylene cutting torch. Heat up to non magnetic and then stick it in a bucket of canola oil.

I'm back home today and I've been out on the patio with sand paper taking off the grind lines. My arm is about to fall off, so I think i'm going to buy a cheap disc sander (HF has one for $14) to speed up the process.

Oh and, the harbor freight $35 bench grinder is a total worthless piece of crap.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Holster/Leather gear making mac66 27 1,715 04-11-2018, 02:14 PM
Last Post: mac66
  Bow making ghost 7 1,956 02-15-2018, 12:33 AM
Last Post: JRSC
  Making 300 Blackout Brass is Easy. TN.Frank 0 314 12-12-2017, 06:46 PM
Last Post: TN.Frank
  I toook a welding class this weekend.. ric0123 5 1,858 05-30-2016, 04:09 PM
Last Post: ric0123

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)