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Karate?
#1
I've done Brazilian Jiu Jitsu for a bit, as well as some Aikido, BJJ is much more practical - but expensive! My daughter does Kickstart karate in school and her teacher also teaches Shotokan Karate outside of school, he's a 6th dan. His classes are very affordable, much more so than any BJJ in the area. 

My son and I are going to try it out this weekend. Anyone have experience in Shotokan Karate?
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#2
This opens a wide area of discussion.  I am a 9th Dan and started in Karate back in 1975.  I am technically the Grandmaster of our system since my instructor retired several years ago.  

My question to you is, 'what is the purpose of the training'?  

The reason I ask this is that probably 90%+ of the 'martial arts' in this (and most countries) is centered around sport and not self defense.  Sport is where the money is and what draws the kids.  Here is a link to some articles I wrote years ago:

Articles

You will find that I am very frank in my assessment of sport vs. self defense.  I have NO problem with sport martial arts (TKD, BJJ, most of karate etc) if that is how it is marketed and that is what the student is wanting.  I take great issue if a sport martial art is marketed as a good system for self defense because it isn't and misleads the student.  As an example, I know Royce Gracie.  Very nice man and very talented.  At one time he was teaching BJJ to L.E. at our regional training center.  At first everyone was like 'wow'.  Mainly because BJJ was the flavor of the month.  Until Officers started to realize that what was being taught, while great in the octagon, was pure crap for the street and would likely get you hurt or worse.  Again, I'm not saying BJJ sucks (or any other martial art), only that while good training methodology for one focus (sport) it is detrimental training methodology a different focus (self defense).  

Shotokan Karate comes from Funakoshi Sensei.  Funakoshi Sensei was a student of Anko Itosu Sensei.  Itosu Sensei was one of three men that ALL the Ryus came from in Okinawan karate.  Itosu Sensei was a college professor in the late 1800's and a karate master.  He wanted to introduce karate into the Okinawan school system for it's health benefits but he realized you can't teach REAL karate to kids as it is too dangerous.  So he took the Pinan katas and while keeping the movements the same relabeled them to have a different meaning i.e. he dumbed down the bunkai.  Funakoshi Sensei took his training to Japan and basically did the same thing.  Karate today is thought of as a block/punch/kick art.  In truth, there are no blocks in karate.  Those 'blocks' are something quite different.  Karate...real karate is sealing the breath, breaking the bone, ripping muscle and ligaments, cavity pressing, throws, sweeps, locks etc.  To give an example, what most schools teach as a 'high block' is in actuality a shoulder lock/dislocation/takedown.  

I could go on and on but I'd probably bore everyone  Smile

In short, if your daughters goal is social interaction, exercise and maybe a few useful things for self defense (and I stress maybe) then Shotokan karate is fine.  If she's looking for self defense, well, Shotokan karate like TKD or BJJ is more detrimental to that goal than useful.  For self defense I would suggest Krav Maga IF the instructor actually knows real Krav Maga and isn't just someone that took a weekend course (which happens a LOT more than you might think).  Or better yet, WWII combatives which is stupid simple but brutally effective.

If I can help in anyway let me know.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#3
During the 50's my dad was a USAF Drill Instructor. He taught Judo to pilots. He also made sure I could defend myself. I never took any classes but dad and I sparred until I was in my mid 20's.
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#4
Thanks! All very good points. My BJJ classes were geared toward practicality and self defense. The instructor would work with you if you wanted to compete but it wasn't his focus. I'm pretty sure the Karate instructor's focus is also on self defense, but he encourages competition to get an actual feel of "combat". I use that loosely, not like a tacticool sense, but to experience what is like to be hit and how to use your skills under stress.

Even in my Aikido days, my instructor was an engineer and a realist. He taught Iwama "style" Aikido (a hard/less lovey style), but was sure to tell you what would and wouldn't work in a real situation. I guess similar to the differences in sport and real Karate.

We didn't get to try it this morning, my son wasn't feeling well. We'll try again on Tuesday evening or next Saturday if I don't make it to drill weekend.
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#5
1st degree in shotakan,also hung-gar.'08.
If you look like food,you will be eaten.


I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.
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#6
Comment on martial arts.

David is correct in his observations about the martial arts.

I will add.  Bruce Lee was correct that a person only needs to know 5 moves for defense.  Have your daughter pick a defensive, not show martial arts, for learning just 5 moves.  I am too old to do judo or san soo any longer.  However, I have my 5 moves. Big Grin

Now to the other dimension.  I have a niece who otherwise would not have qualified to attend a University of California campus.  She is a peanut (read runt).  Dad put her into soccer which is a sport.  She blossomed in her social contacts and confidence.  She became an all-American soccer player.   Smile
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#7
(04-30-2018, 05:18 PM)bdcochran Wrote: I will add.  Bruce Lee was correct that a person only needs to know 5 moves for defense.  Have your daughter pick a defensive, not show martial arts, for learning just 5 moves.  I am too old to do judo or san soo any longer.  However, I have my 5 moves. Big Grin

Any suggestions?
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#8
Several suggestions for simple, practical self-defense.  

Get Tough

Fighters Fact Book

Fighters Fact Book 2
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#9
Also, real self-defense isn't tippy tap hitting.  It isn't dancing around.  It isn't fancy stances or acrobatics.  It is an unexpected explosion of violence to end an attack and get to safety.

Link
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply
#10
Link
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply


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