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The forgotten container
#1
Ok.  Shtf.  You have to carry water, supplies or store water and supplies.  Simply having a water filter doesn't cut it.  Or simply having a backpack.

I was living with the Ahka tribe in the highlands.  The water came from a well; not a mythical stream envisioned by armchair survivalists.  If you wanted water, you had to have a carrying device, walk to the well, load up and go home.  You had to pick up your cooking water, washing water, bathing water, clean up water.    5 gallons of water weighs 40 pounds.  The women did not have #2 paint buckets (#2 on the bottom means food grade).  They didn't have twist off tops.  They had to use hollowed out bamboo.  They were strong. 

So, now you face a problem.  The average person uses over 200 gallons of water a day.  All right, so you cut down the usage.  You still need to haul it.  So, I have 5 gallon food grade buckets with twist off/reusable lids that can be used for other types of storage.  I have a push cart and a dolly.  If I had a supermarket basket, I would be still better off.

I picked up a dozen or so empty plastic flasks.  I also have a couple dozen empty 2 liter bottles (they will deteriorate if you store even water in them),
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#2
We actually have a couple of wagons that would allow us to haul water. I don't remember right off, but the wagons are rated for around 150lbs, maybe more (I posted in one of the threads how much their were rated for). We figured with the size of the wagons and the load ability, that we would be able to get 15 gallons in each wagon. In addition, we have added rain barrels that we can use to capture water. The downside with this system is that it has to be kept dry in the winter to prevent damaging the system.

Knowing where available water sources are and how to get there and back with the supplies you need should be part of every plan.

Here is a simple wagon that is easy to store and deploy.

https://www.samsclub.com/sams/blue-wagon...o-viewed:1
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#3
Forgotten container.  Years ago, I purchased a game carrier with a max capacity of 600 pounds.  I took it to a blacksmith and had him add a collar purchased from a bike store to the carrier.  Now, I could attach the game carrier to any bicycle.  The problem remains that the material is not a cross hatched metal bottom, but a piece of modern cloth material.  A sharp edge might cut it.  Conversely, it has been sitting out in the weather for years and the material has not disintegrated.  I have no running or stagnant water source within miles.  If there were, I would buy one of the wagons that cost under $100 and modify the bottom to be steel and not cloth material.

Container comments:

1.  I cannot move a 30 or 50 gallon container of water.  Not a big deal.  I bought some battery driven cheap pumps from Red China.  They are made so that you can access and drain a big container cleanly.

2.  I didn't have a wide enough space behind the garage to store 30 and 50 gallon containers of water.  However, the clearance was good enough to allow a long stack of three high 5 gallon food quality paint bucks (#2 on bottom) and twist off lids from Home Depot.  I can handle carrying 40 pounds of water and then using the units with twist off lids for other kinds of storage.

3.  I no longer remember where I purchased them, but I give you another option.  You have seen a large metal milk dispensing machine.  Inside is a plastic bladder.  Well, an officer in Hawaii saw this and said why not use something like this as a collapsable water container.  Instead of a rigid bucket that might be 1/4 filled, how about a bladder that you can fold down and take less space.  So, I purchased a carton of them.  Full, they take up space.  Empty, they are collapsed for easy carry and refill.
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#4
Something else to think about, if SHTF and you need to improvise water storage, you can use trash cans or old 5 gallon buckets and place them under your home water spots to make a rain catch system. The concern with using either of those is knowing what was in there in the past. Our main garbage can, I wouldn't use because to many different chemicals have been it. Yet our two large recyclable containers would be perfect for that.

Would it be ideal? Nope, but it would give you the ability to get water at your house assuming you don't live in the desert.
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#5
(04-18-2018, 11:10 AM)bmyers Wrote: Something else to think about, if SHTF and you need to improvise water storage, you can use trash cans or old 5 gallon buckets and place them under your home water spots to make a rain catch system. The concern with using either of those is knowing what was in there in the past. Our main garbage can, I wouldn't use because to many different chemicals have been it. Yet our two large recyclable containers would be perfect for that.  

Would it be ideal? Nope, but it would give you the ability to get water at your house assuming you don't live in the desert.

Hopefully, you keep the rain spouts/gutters/roof clean and free of debris/chemicals.
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#6
For the most part they are free of debris, they get their annual spring cleaning.
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#7
I have this one:
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/produc..._vc=-10005
it carries 3- 5 gallon buckets of water real easy. I cut a thick rubber mat to cover the bottom. We have had this long enough to have changed all of the tires to solid rubbers and have no flats ever now. We use it to transfer water from the water barrels to the garden and hydroponics system. 
I have easily carried a 4 cylinder engine across the yard with this cart. Good cart.


Quote:
"Here is a simple wagon that is easy to store and deploy." 

https://www.samsclub.com/sams/blue-wagon...o-viewed:1

I have this one also, I don't recommend trying it for anything more than carrying in the groceries, it really sucks off road too.
I pulled this cart loaded with fire wood, drinks, food and all my camp stuff for two miles into the woods one time, (enough stuff for the weekend) and hated every minute of it. I would have left it in the woods but Jimmy talked me out of it- good thing too, it's the wife's cart, she would have been pissed.

The idea is a good one, it's just poorly executed for any real utility with this model, Sorry bd... 


We have walked to and recognized every water source within walking distance in our area. We have a nice pile of 5 gallon buckets with screw on lids saved up just for this. Next on the list will be a still.

.

We also have a brand new/ never used plastic garbage can just for water storage when needed and a few empty plastic water cooler bottles. Oh yeah and the water BOB.
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#8
It is post shtf.  I will give a larger context to the concept of the forgotten container considerations.

You may have thought about carrying a plastic or a metal water container, filtration, sterilization.  The following is what I have come up with in my thinking.

If you are on guard duty, if you are foraging, it may just not be possible to carry one container with clean water and expect the one container to keep you hydrated.  "Water discipline" was demonstrated as a non starter by an Israeli army exercise that I describe.  An army unit was deliberately walked from one end of Israel to the other in the summer.  The soldiers were constantly re-hydrated (notice, no "water discipline" or sticking rocks under a tongue!).  The soldiers finished the walk ready to fight.

I came up with a bladder in a back pack with a filter inline.  The problem is that first time you put dubious water in the bladder, you have a problem that it is now possibly contaminated.  You can't just go back to camp and put clean water in the same bladder.

You may not have time to stop and boil water.  You may not have time to drop in some chemical. 

So another option (to keep the bladder clean) is to carry a second container in which to put the dirty water.  Then you attempt to sterilize it before putting it in the bladder.  So, I purchased some steripen units and carry one in the car.

You can use lifestraws and similar products, but they filter and do not sterilize water.
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