Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Sensible Prepper (comments and reviews)
#31
It is always good to view a person's list.

I will deal with the toilet paper. I went for months in cultures wherein toilet paper was not available. Much of the time was spent moving daily. What you need is a dedicated wash cloth that you clean frequently and dry with the sun. Just what do you think humans did before toilet paper and excluding leaves? They used dedicated cloths. Now, take trip to India. Most places do not have running water and bathrooms. The railroad tracks is where most people take a dump. There are not mounds of toilet paper on the railroad tracks.

Next, let me deal with eating utensils. The US military stopped issued the old style, metal food gear. Why? Because it could not be kept clean in the field. No one advocates picking up free plastic forks/spoons/knives at fast food places. No one advocates picking up piles of paper plates. Yet, the same people ignore the necessity to keep eating utensils and plates clean. Just pick up a large supply. That is, unless you have your own well and free hot water.,

Another item rarely dealt with in the hundreds of lists are empty pop bottles. When the power is off, the city water isn't running to the house, you are quickly going to try figure out how to transport water (hint - you carry it like most people in the world from the water source to the home). You are also going to try to figure out how you store small supplies. Another hint. When shtf and you have to carry water, there is a division of labor. If you, as a grown adult, have skills, you will not be going to the water supply and hauling it all day. You will pass that duty onto kids. They can not carry a load of 40 pounds in a 5 gallon bucket. They can carry 2 liter pop bottles.

Reading lists is fine as reminders come up. The lists are not a substitute for you figuring out what will be your reality.
Reply
#32
(08-15-2019, 04:02 PM)bdcochran Wrote: It is always good to view a person's list.

I will deal with the toilet paper.  I went for months in cultures wherein toilet paper was not available.  Much of the time was spent moving daily.  What you need is a dedicated wash cloth that you clean frequently and dry with the sun.  Just what do you think humans did before toilet paper and excluding leaves?  They used dedicated cloths.  Now, take trip to India.  Most places do not have running water and bathrooms.  The railroad tracks is where most people take a dump.  There are not mounds of toilet paper on the railroad tracks.

Next, let me deal with eating utensils.  The US military stopped issued the old style, metal food gear.  Why?  Because it could not be kept clean in the field.  No one advocates picking up free plastic forks/spoons/knives at fast food places.  No one advocates picking up piles of paper plates.  Yet, the same people ignore the necessity to keep eating utensils and plates clean.  Just pick up a large supply.  That is, unless you have your own well and free hot water.,

Another item rarely dealt with in the hundreds of lists are empty pop bottles.  When the power is off, the city water isn't running to the house, you are quickly going to try figure out how to transport water (hint - you carry it like most people in the world from the water source to the home).  You are also going to try to figure out how you store small supplies.  Another hint.  When shtf and you have to carry water, there is a division of labor.  If you, as a grown adult, have skills, you will not be going to the water supply and hauling it all day.  You will pass that duty onto kids.  They can not carry a load of 40 pounds in a 5 gallon bucket.  They can carry 2 liter pop bottles.

Reading lists is fine as reminders come up.  The lists are not a substitute for you figuring out what will be your reality.

We went to Sams and bought a large boxes of plastic forks, spoons, and knives. We also keep the little packets of utensils you get when you order out that has the napkin, utensil, salt and pepper in them. They all go into a plastic container so we have a nice supply of those. 

We have old two liter bottles with water in them. We keep them handy for such things like flushing the total, and items like that. We could boil the water in them again Or use or distiller to make the water drinkable if the need arose. We have some 5 gallon jugs and two hand wagons that we can put the jugs in to transport back and forth. Our bikes have a rear rack where one 5-gallon jug can be secured (we are about 7 miles from the Mississippi River, so a large water source there). In addition, at the farm we have two wells, one of 60 feet deep, the other only 13 feet deep and a spring. The 60 ft well takes electricity to get water from, the other two sources do not. 

Water in our area is relatively plentiful. 

The challenge will be staying safe when others become desperate.
Reply
#33
We make a common practice of stocking up on plastic utensils and napkins, particularly if we're at a fast-food place.  Just as easy to clean as metal, if applicable, but disposable in necessary.

Water is also very plentiful in our area.  Within a 5-minute walk of the house we have at least 3 ponds big enough for gators.  One is literally across the street that was big enough for a 12-footer and two 7-footers several years ago.  Rain is plentiful, particularly in the spring/summer.  With the Sawyer water filters and the Berkey I feel like we have that area well covered.

When Sootch00 was talking about the small plastic bags, one of the first things I thought of was using it for solid waste (toilet).  We get them from the stores already for our normal garbage and cleaning the litter box so it would make a good place to bag up human solid waste as well.  

Good comments on alternatives to toilet paper.  Disposable baby wipes will go a long way towards staying clean as well.  Sanitary as well as psychological comfort in feeling clean can go a long way.  

While I agree that it's good to have regular batteries on hand, I also like rechargeable batteries and methods to charge them up using solar power.  I have a thread on that very thing with folding solar panels and a charger that uses USB.  Great way to have a renewable resource whereas regular batteries are one-and-done.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Herbal Prepper David 1 1,524 11-14-2015, 06:59 PM
Last Post: kirgi08
  Sensible Prepper - uses for stuff David 0 1,298 09-10-2015, 12:47 PM
Last Post: David

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)