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Tomahawks
#1
Discuss all things tomahawk here.

For some reason the Native American influence is getting the best of me. I want one. Looking into this one. Any of you have recommendations? 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00AXV0OV...-5GvL&th=1
In The Age Of Information, Ignorance Is A Choice.
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#2
We have these in our GHB

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000PICTYC/ref...rd_w=CDydH

They are lightweight, so easy packing and versatile.
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#3
(12-10-2017, 11:09 AM)bmyers Wrote: We have these in our GHB

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000PICTYC/ref...rd_w=CDydH

They are lightweight, so easy packing and versatile.

Check out Dixie Gun Works. They have the more practical "Hawks". A hammer poll is of more use than a spike. The only usless one [IMO] is the "pipe" version. The 3- 3 1/2 " blade and a 19" handle make for a formidable weapon, small axe, carving tool, butchering tool, throwing weapon, self defense, hammer, and anything else you might think of. A good alternative would be the Eswing campers hatchet.

Going to a rendezvous meeting of muzzleloaders will show you several different models of "hawks", as will any event with an old time blacksmith.

Enjoy the pleasure of the search for what will work best for you.
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#4
I'm looking for one to tinker with around the woods. I'm leaning towards the Estwing because it's entirely a chunk of metal. If it's like my Camping Hatchet, it's practically indestructible. Most people prefer the hammer over the spike but for some reason I want the spike. Something interesting to mess with.

I'm going to make one. On a camping trip last year, I set up a fire pit with some rocks from a nearby creek. One of the rocks broke off at the top from the heat and is dern near a tomahawk head in its entirety. I just have to knap a blade on one side and work on a handle. The back of the head is blunt so I'll either keep it that way or try to flatten it.
In The Age Of Information, Ignorance Is A Choice.
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#5
I had one of those 'Vietnam' hawks and I was extremely not impressed with it. What i mean is, the head of the hawk was SO light. it didn't have enough weight to really cut anything. It barely cut tree roots. I like the idea, but I'm failing to see how they are used in the real world. I know the Indians used them for a long time, I just fail to see how??
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#6
This one is the best thrower that I currently own:
https://www.amazon.com/Vaughan-205-20-Ca...an+hatchet

I bought an old used one at the pawn shop for 2 bucks a couple of years ago, I liked it so much that when I found them at the Wmart for $20 bucks I had to buy another. It has been very useful...

I also have one of those light tactical lookin hawks, it is so light that it's hard to stick it in the tree.

Also have a couple of the traditional lookin, forged steel tomahawks= those are fun... Ask Bob.
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#7
(12-12-2017, 03:49 AM)Gene Wrote: This one is the best thrower that I currently own:
https://www.amazon.com/Vaughan-205-20-Ca...an+hatchet

I bought an old used one at the pawn shop for 2 bucks a couple of years ago, I liked it so much that when I found them at the Wmart for $20 bucks I had to buy another. It has been very useful...

I also have one of those light tactical lookin hawks, it is so light that it's hard to stick it in the tree.

Also have a couple of the traditional lookin, forged steel tomahawks= those are fun... Ask Bob.

Good recommendations.  I do not MAKE tomahawks.  I restore tomahawks/hatchets/axes.  This means that I can come close to making a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

There is no "best" unit.  However, I will make some observations that may assist.

1.  determine the application.  At times, I have kept a carpenter's hatchet in the trunk on the bases that I may need to chop and hammer. 

That design would not do if I were a combatant. 

Some people want a throwing hatchet because they saw a movie.  Ok.  Just understand that you are going to damage the unit fairly quickly.  How about throwing a unit, missing the target and the tomahawk landing on a rock!

For all around utility, a hatchet with a 16 inch handle seems right.

2.  no matter what your selection, you will need a sheath.  Most units are sold without a sheath.  Oh oh!  If you are lucky and measure correctly, you can buy a commercial sheath on line.  But what kind of sheath?  Are you going to do a strong or weak side carry?  Are you wanting to sling it across the back of a pack or maybe hang it from a pack.  Your big box store or the local mom and pop store will not have what you want.  If you cannot make it or find it on line, put a youtube video on a usb stick and take it and the tomahawk/hatchet/axe to your local shoe repair place.  I make my own (functional) and unfortunately they will not hang in the Museum of Contemporary Art.

3.  Now I address the handle.  What I am describing is functional, not to reproduce a tomahawk from The Last of the Mohicans or a John Wayne movie.  You will get hot spots/blisters using a tomahawk/hatchet/axe.  And, you won't always be wearing a pair of gloves.  So, you tape the handle first with electrician type tape and then an overlay of tennis racket tape.  Have you ever wondered about the shape of heads and the handles?  Well, it is no fun delivering a shock to your arm when your tomahawk/hatchet/axe strikes and you are holding on.  Taping the handle means:  1.  something is there to absorb some shock of a strike; 2. you don't have to keep restoring/lubing the handle; 3. you have a better grip than just clutching bare wood.

4.  Most tomahawks/hatchets/axes I have acquired have been in less than best shape.  Why?

1. because the unit was stored on the ground.  Solution.  Drill a hole about one inch from the end of the handle;  pass 550 cord through and tie off.  Now you hang the unit on a peg on the wall, on a branch, on a nail and don't leave the darn thing on the ground where it will rust or you will step on it.

2.  the previous owner used the unit as a hammer and squashed the head; 3.  the previous owner did not use a support and chipped the head; 4.  the previous owner left it out in the rain and it rusted.  Solution: 1. soak the head in vinegar overnight and keep doing that to remove a lot of rust; 2. use a bench grinder to resquare the head; 3. use a belt sander to restore the cutting edge of the head.  Yeah, I know.  Some dude will respond that he likes the old fashioned method of using a stone.  Yep, I have stones.  However, I have limited time and was WILLING to watch a number of youtube videos on using common workshop equipment other than a stone to sharpen a unit.

Some of the nifty knife sharpeners may not work with sharpening if the opening is too narrow for the cutting edge of the unit head. 

For the rust that vinegar will not remove, you have to figure out how to do it otherwise.  Sometimes I use a belt sander or the edge of the belt for narrower edges.  Sometimes hand sanding.  Sometimes a light touch with the bench grinder.

Above all, after you have removed some rust, the unit is subject to nearly immediate oxidation, so lightly lube the same day even if you have to resume sanding the next day.

I do also own the units depicted in the previous postings.
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#8
Look in to a vector hawk I think you can find them on the dirt time fourm

https://youtu.be/Ffhn7Xc_r8M
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