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Pack Weight Theory
#1
Video 


Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#2
After I had walked through the Khyber Pass, I weighed my pack and that of my late wife - 19 and 21 pounds, respectively.  We were on the road for 8 months.

During the Panama invasion, soldiers were air dropped away from an airport, with the goal being to secure the airport.  Each carried over 100 pounds of gear - in the tropics.

There is a direct correlation between pack weight and degraded physical condition under survival  conditions.  Once had to choose between boots and sneakers, one or two blankets on a three day, up and down, in the mud trek through the Golden Triangle.  Chose the sneakers and the one blanket.

Most people ask for "lists" and pack way too much.

Now I am older and urban.  Do I have a stuffed three day back?  Absolutely not.  I have over 100 pounds of gear in the trunk of the car packed in waterproof, locked Korean duffle backs and a three day pack.  If and when I am about and there is an emergency, I want 10 minutes to pick and choose.

My mentor is about 80 years old.  He did up 6 packs of about 35-50 pounds and placed some with relatives.  Different approach.

The Israeli Army did an experiment.  Took a unit and marched it from one end of the country to the other.  No water discipline imposed.  Instead, people were encouraged to drink a lot of water.  That unit performed better than other units at the end of the march.  So when you think about a pack, forget the nonsense about having 5 kinds of firestarter.  Focus on the items that keep you moving like a way to clean water, bandaids, scissors, a bar of soap, small towel, vaseline, foot powder.
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#3




Keith Burgess is a historian and studies 18th Century American and British history and survival. Thought this video would accompany this thread well.
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#4
(09-11-2015, 04:15 PM)bdcochran Wrote: After I had walked through the Khyber Pass, I weighed my pack and that of my late wife - 19 and 21 pounds, respectively.  We were on the road for 8 months.

Could you please expand on what the contents of your packs were, given your long time on the road.
Also what was your access to amenities so that you were freed from having to carry stuff with you

Thanks
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#5
(09-11-2015, 04:15 PM)bdcochran Wrote: After I had walked through the Khyber Pass, I weighed my pack and that of my late wife - 19 and 21 pounds, respectively.  We were on the road for 8 months.

During the Panama invasion, soldiers were air dropped away from an airport, with the goal being to secure the airport.  Each carried over 100 pounds of gear - in the tropics.

There is a direct correlation between pack weight and degraded physical condition under survival  conditions.  Once had to choose between boots and sneakers, one or two blankets on a three day, up and down, in the mud trek through the Golden Triangle.  Chose the sneakers and the one blanket.

Most people ask for "lists" and pack way too much.

Now I am older and urban.  Do I have a stuffed three day back?  Absolutely not.  I have over 100 pounds of gear in the trunk of the car packed in waterproof, locked Korean duffle backs and a three day pack.  If and when I am about and there is an emergency, I want 10 minutes to pick and choose.

My mentor is about 80 years old.  He did up 6 packs of about 35-50 pounds and placed some with relatives.  Different approach.

The Israeli Army did an experiment.  Took a unit and marched it from one end of the country to the other.  No water discipline imposed.  Instead, people were encouraged to drink a lot of water.  That unit performed better than other units at the end of the march.  So when you think about a pack, forget the nonsense about having 5 kinds of firestarter.  Focus on the items that keep you moving like a way to clean water, bandaids, scissors, a bar of soap, small towel, vaseline, foot powder.

That's the key right there...experience.  It allows one to actually hump a pack over various terrain to see what was actually needed, how far one could travel, how fast they can travel,  how much weight can reasonably be carried and a whole host of other essentials.  The net and YT abound with folks lists and packs.  And that's not a bad thing in that you may be able to pick up a tip or trick or see a better piece of gear or set up than what you're using now.  And it also allows you to assess your physical capabilities. 

One of the things we've talked about doing on one of our SEP gatherings is going as minimalist as is reasonably possible.  For us that would mean not even using a backpack.  Rather we'd likely use something along the lines of a shoulder/sling style pack. 

Figure you need shelter:  A hammock w/rain fly is about as small/light as you're going to get and as long as you've got a couple of trees you gold.  Even if you don't you can still have ground and overhead cover in a pinch.

Figure you need water:  Water weight 8lbs to a gallon so it's too much to carry in large quantity.  But if you have a reliable filtration system such as a Sawyer bottle you can carry a liter and refill on the go.  That's about as simple as it gets unless you want to go for chemical disinfection.  I'd still opt to carry a small quantity of some sort of powder that has vitamins/electrolyte replacement. 

Figure you need fire:  Realistically fire-starting devices are small and light so you could have several methods at no sacrifice.

Figure you need food:  Assuming it's not a true survival situation where food isn't as high up on the priority list, it is still important to keep one's strength (and spirit) up and running.  Nutritionally dense food can be light enough to carry i.e. trail mix/jerky etc.  Additionally it is possible to get some nutrition off the land if one knows what to look for.  As an example, making pine needle tea for vitamin C.  Berries, fruits etc.  And some on the board are quite adept with a sling shot which is handy enough to fit in a back pocket. 

Other items fill various wants or needs, but actual 'must haves' can be quite small/light if you had to go that route.  I could carry pretty much everything I need in a sling bag (at least for a few days of survival).  Will I be comfy?  Probably not, but could I survive?  Odds would be much more in my favor.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#6
Found this interesting. The more you know the less you need.


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#7
Kind of an old thread but I'll play. When I was scoutmaster we used to take the kids backpacking for the weekend. It was a good time to try out stuff and find out what worked and what didn't. Over the course of my time as a scout leader I wittled away the stuff I carried down to a minimum even on week long trips. I rarely carried more than a military type poncho & liner or fleece blanket as a liner. A piece of plastic for a ground cloth and/or additional shelter. A small swiss army knife, matches, small FAK. Rarely had more than the clothes on my back and those were rinse out and wear and layerable.

While everyone mostly used freeze dried foods, I usually stripped down MREs and rarely heated them. MREs has a ton of calories so you can eat parts one MRE for every meal. Freeze food dried requires water but I preferred to drink the water I carried rather than cook with it. When I did heat an MRE it was in the water I was using to make instant coffee which usually was the only thing I heated.

I typically made a lean-to out of the poncho, used a inflatable pillow, had a small plastic shovel to make a cathole, a small headlamp, a water filter, and had few personal hygene items. Including the daypack and food, I rarely carried more than 20 pounds. In fact on regular camp out I used my set up to show the kids how little you could get by on. Of course that was before cell phones, water bladders and all that kind of stuff.

Edited to add... Being older now I am probably going to carry an inflatable pad to sleep on. Also, I would probably use a nylon tarp as shelter instead of a poncho and a Life Straw instead of a full blown water filter.
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