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Bike
#1
As in the kind you petal. 

Quite and not dependent on a fuel source other than yourself.  Most of our SEP gatherings involved using a bike to get out to the remote location.  With proper structuring they make a viable mode of transportation with the ability to carry a bit more than you'd probably be able to hump.

I know Gene has some bike set ups that are pretty cool.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#2
Another point on bikes as a good mode of transportation is that they've been used for a good many years in other countries to move a fairly large amount of stuff and people.  Particularly in countries where cars aren't all over the place.  Does it replace a good truck?  Nope.  But it might be all that's available given the type of SHTF scenario. 

Just tossing that out there.
Governmental dependance makes for poor self reliance.

"What could possibly go wrong with a duct tape boat?"  Cody Lundin

The best defense against evil men are good men with violent skill sets.
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#3
Bikes are very viable forms of transport,they can go pretty much anywhere.They can tow trailers and can generate power while being ridden,parts and tools are simple and cached along selected routes.The downside you ain't pushing a gas peddle,you gotta work at it to use bikes for a scenario.'08.
If you look like food,you will be eaten.


I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by 6.
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#4
The only downside to a bike is your level of physical fitness.
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#5
(07-19-2015, 04:08 PM)David Wrote: As in the kind you petal. 

Quite and not dependent on a fuel source other than yourself.  Most of our SEP gatherings involved using a bike to get out to the remote location.  With proper structuring they make a viable mode of transportation with the ability to carry a bit more than you'd probably be able to hump.

I know Gene has some bike set ups that are pretty cool.

Bikes  yes, big fan, have a few but I'm still holding out for a uh1 iroquois... Just sumethin about those as of late that are makin me want one.
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#6
Recently finished my Bug Home Bike, this is the vehicle that will get me home from work if something happens. I have been using it to ride to lunch- there's a subway around the corner that I've been hitting alot lately, or I just go for a ride just because.
The folding handle bars and peddles were purchased from Ebay and were not expensive. This bike has gotten a real test last weekend when it hauled my heavy butt, a 25lb pack, my tent gear and almost 3 gallons of water two and a half miles into the woods and back out. So the folding stuff works...

I bought the bike from a used bike shop for $50 bucks and all I've HAD to do to it is grease the front wheel bearings and replace the grips, the rest is just cool stuff.

This bike will stay at work:

   [Image: 1211151418_zpscxir9p2t.jpg]

[Image: 1211151417a_zpsckto6a39.jpg]

The cool other stuff also added (besides bars and peddles) are the spring seat post, more comfy seat (leftover from the wife's Giant), Wmart luggage rack and Wmart saddle bags.

I work 6 miles from home, in the case of an event, with out calamity, I should make it home in about 35 minutes (I have ridden to work before).
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#7
That looks like you could do a good job with it. I would add a tire pump and lights, but that is just me.

My sister and her husband bought 2 very nice Diamondback mountain bikes about 20 years ago. About 10 years ago they put them out in the pole barn on the farm with some of their other stuff. All the rubber has dry rotted and squirrels have eaten the seats and there is rust on the derailers and chain. I am going to get one of them in 2016 and rebuild it. I believe I can do a full restore for less than what a new bike would cost.

About 28 years ago I would ride a bike to work. It was 6 miles one way. I was in the best shape of my life then.
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#8
I am a big fan of bicycles and typically ride my bike at least 5 days a week, 25-40 miles a day in good weather and often farther. I try to do a 60+ miles ride once a week and a 100 mile ride a couple times a summer. My principle work out bike is a Specialized Explorer hybrid comfort bike modified for long rides with a a rack etc. I can put panniers on it to carry stuff. I've gone on a number of multiple night trips on it and have stealth camped along the road. The nice thing about them is that you can go pretty far pretty quickly compared to walking. They also help you explore your environment. I've found places I didn't know existed in my area simply by riding around.

Did I mention that bike riding is also good low impact exercise?
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#9
Quote:
"That looks like you could do a good job with it. I would add a tire pump and lights, but that is just me."


That is a good idea, I will also look for a small/ light weight tool/ tire patch kit to hang under the seat. 
I am looking forward to seeing your Diamondback restoration= these types of projects are fun and fulfilling when finished unlike just buying something.


Quote:
"Did I mention that bike riding is also good low impact exercise?"

That is the main purpose for the bikes for the wife and I, the fun I'm having with fixing them up is just extra. I wish I had the time to ride 25 miles a week much less a day= you are the man...
My current favorite is a Trek hybrid comfort bike= I have never ridden a bike so easy to ride as this one, it makes you feel like you could ride all day.

I definitely would not have been able to bring as much stuff out camping last week with out the bike.
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#10
I use bikes regularly for recreation and utility.  They are also part of my preps.

Bicycle touring is a good way to test preps.  I converted a mountain bike for touring use.
[Image: 001_zps82485505.jpg]

Stripped Tag-along host for cargo hauler
[Image: 025.jpg]

In its current configuration I've added a rack over the rear wheel and a stem with handlebar into the seatpost tube for more lashing points.  
[Image: 011_zpss2yv2hps.jpg]

Initially I built cargo tray/rack for it but it proved unnecessary - it added weight and most items I hauled could be lashed directly to the frame without additional support. It worked well for shuttling water containers to camp.

[Image: 006-4.jpg]

I've spec'd the bikes with old style thumb or bar end shifters.  Both styles will index on 7 & 8 speed cassettes and can be used on 5 and 6 speed freewheels in friction mode and with a minor adjustment to the derailleur travel limit screws should I need to salvage / cannibalize a wheel from another bike along the way.
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