Survival & Emergency Preparedness Board

Full Version: Alone
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Gene started this thread on the old SEP board:


Quote:Anyone seen the new one called Alone? They drop off 10 guys on an island in Vancouver with 10 items of there choice to live off the land as long as they can stand it. The last one there wins $500,000 grand.

So far one man has tapped out after one night, seems he didn't care for the little Bear family that came to visit in the night.

Alone on the History Channel

Thursdays @ 10 pm eastern

Here\'s each man\'s bio and equipment list:

Josh Chavez

Josh considers himself a natural leader, and with his job as a law enforcement officer, he’s given the chance to test those leadership skills on a daily basis. When he’s not in uniform, he excels as an avid hunter, with bushcraft and survival skills developed through practice and a number of wilderness courses. Josh’s passion for outdoor self-reliance started in childhood with hunting. He soon realized how closely bushcraft skills were tied to the sport and his interest took off from there. For Josh, braving the wild of Vancouver Island is about the greatest test of the skills he’s been crafting for years. Although his greatest fear is leaving his family behind (including a pregnant wife, his daughter and son) he has always been a person to look danger in the eyes and is eager to see if his training as a police officer and outdoorsman will be enough for him to survive in such a rugged natural environment.

Here are the ten items Josh selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. 12×12 ground sheet
2. 550 paracord – 20m
3. Saw
4. Axe
5. Sleeping bag
6. Bivi bag (gortex sleeping bag cover)
7. Large 2-quart pot
8. Ferro rod
9. 300 yards of single filament line with 25 assorted hooks
10. Bow and 6 arrows

*****

Dustin Feher

Dustin doesn’t consider himself a “survival expert.” Instead, he sees himself as an expert outdoorsman–the difference being his life is rarely in “imminent danger” when he’s in the wild. He’s learned by his own hand how to live and sustain himself in the wilderness, thanks to numerous weeks spent in the American backcountry. His solo expeditions have taken him from Montana to Alaska, pushing him to rely less and less on modern equipment to guide and support him. He knows he will have to push himself harder than ever once alone on Vancouver Island. He plans to rely heavily on his real world experience during this time in the wild. He’s left behind his wife and their two dogs, and while he’s trying to understand the enormity of the challenges involved, he’s excited to learn more about himself and test his mental toughness.

Here are the ten items Dustin selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. 550 paracord – 20m
2. Axe
3. Sleeping bag
4. Large 2-quart pot
5. Ferro rod
6. Water bottle/canteen
7. 300 yards of single filament line with 25 assorted hooks
8. Small gauge gill net
9. Slingshot
10. Knife

*****

Sam Larson

Sam works for a large outdoor gear retailer in Lincoln, Nebraska, where he lives with his wife, Sydney, who is seven months pregnant with their first child. Sam has been studying wilderness-living and survival skills for most of his life. His interest in the lifestyle began in elementary school when he saw an arrowhead exhibit at a natural history museum. At 14, he sold most of his belongings to pay for a canoe expedition in northern Ontario. After high school, Sam travelled to northern Maine to study bushcraft at the Jack Mountain Bushcraft School. Although he enjoyed his time there, Sam had the urge to experience a new environment, so he sold his Jeep to purchase a plane ticket to Arizona where he lived under an Army poncho and learned from one of his bushcraft mentors. The following year Sam traveled to New Mexico where he traversed the Gila Wilderness alone, with only minimal gear and a handful of granola. Sam is taking on this adventure as an opportunity to experience a new environment and to test his skills. It’s a personal journey, and Sam has never been able to turn down a good adventure. He’s expecting Vancouver Island to be his most challenging experience yet.

Here are the ten items Sam selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. 12×12 ground sheet tarp
2. Axe
3. Sleeping bag
4. Large 2-quart pot
5. Ferro rod
6. 300 yards of single filament line with 25 assorted hooks
7. Bow and 6 arrows
8. Slingshot
9. Extra emergency rations
10. Knife

*****

Alan Kay

Alan was born and raised in Georgia, where he spent the majority of his childhood in the forests making shelters with his beloved hatchet. His passion for the woods grew as the years passed, and by the time he was in his 20s, Alan had acquired the skills and mindset necessary to adapt and survive in any environment. In an effort to increase his understanding of edible and medicinal plants, Alan sought out and studied under a number of knowledgeable elders, all of whom helped to round out his growing skill set. He also spent time developing proficiency in the combative arts, including barehanded, stick and knife fighting. In his role as a corrections officer, he’s also been trained in tactical medical care. Alan knows that he’s bound to encounter situations beyond his control and imagination on Vancouver Island. He has left behind a wife and children for this opportunity and is ready to put all of his skills together and push himself to the limits—physically, psychologically and emotionally.

Here are the ten items Alan selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. Saw
2. Axe
3. Sleeping bag
4. Large 2-quart pot
5. Ferro rod
6. Water bottle/canteen
7. 300 yards single filament line with 25 assorted hooks
8. Small gauge gill net
9. 3.5lb wire
10. Knife

*****

Brant McGee

Born in North Carolina, Brant grew up hunting and fishing on the Atlantic coast, on inland lakes and along rivers. During his military career in the U.S. Coast Guard, Brant was introduced to both land and sea survival techniques. After his tour with the Coast Guard, Brant became a full time employee of the Army Guard, where he served the remainder of his career as a helicopter crewman and gunner. Brant has utilized the skills he learned during his military career and forged a deeper understanding and respect for various survival techniques. Brant has also traveled as far as the Arctic Circle to provide aviation survival courses and impart the lessons he’s learned surviving in some of the world’s most challenging environments. For Brant, this experience on Vancouver Island is about the challenge and personal struggle he knows he will face. Brant has left behind a wife and three daughters to travel to the island. He believes if his various experiences have taught him anything, it is that survival is extremely dynamic and success or failure can hinge on the smallest factors.

Here are the ten items Brant selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. 12×12 ground sheet tarp
2. 550 paracord – 20m
3. Axe
4. Sleeping bag
5. Large 2-quart pot
6. Ferro rod
7. 300 yards of single filament line with 25 assorted hooks
8. Bow and 6 arrows
9. Extra emergency rations
10. Knife

*****

Lucas Miller

Although he resides in Albuquerque, New Mexico, having grown up in northeastern Iowa, Lucas was a farm boy who always felt at home outdoors. When presented with the opportunity to see the world at 19, Lucas accepted, and the resulting journey led him to study a variety of subjects that included traditional medicine, indigenous living skills, rites of passage, homesteading and wilderness living. After being diagnosed with Lyme disease, he combined a vegetarian lifestyle, supported by his practice of yoga and curative therapies to help himself heal. Healthy again, Lucas embarked on a trip into the Rocky Mountains, without food, to partake in a vision fast. He’s leaving behind his parents, four siblings, eight nieces and nephews and his girlfriend. As he prepares to experience the wilderness of northern Vancouver Island alone, Lucas believes his work with wilderness therapies will offer him a great advantage over the other participants. He knows this unique experience will test him spiritually, mentally and physically.

Here are the ten items Lucas selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. 12×12 ground sheet tarp
2. Saw
3. Axe
4. Sleeping bag
5. Large 2-quart pot
6. Ferro rod
7. 300 yards of single filament line with 25 assorted hooks
8. Extra Tarp
9. Extra emergency rations
10. Knife

*****

Mitch Mitchell

Mitch’s love for the outdoors began in typical fashion, playing in the woods near his hometown in Massachusetts. He also enjoyed fishing with his father and grandfather, who passed down to Mitch some of the traditional wilderness living skills from his family’s First Nations Canadian roots. These experiences planted the seeds for Mitch’s future in the wild. Mitch later joined the Boy Scouts of America, where he was exposed to the fundamentals of woodslore, consisting of firecraft, knotcraft, wood carving, group hiking standards, first aid, canoeing, shooting and navigation, among other skills. However, it was during a week-long camping trip when he found himself caught in the middle of a hurricane that he truly realized his passion for woodland living, bushcraft,and incorporating primitive skills into his daily life. Mitch is excited to face whatever might await him on Vancouver Island. Although he’s leaving behind his wife and daughter, he’s eager to test his limits, skills and love for the outdoors.

Here are the ten items Mitch selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. Axe
2. Sleeping bag
3. Bivi bag (gortex sleeping cover)
4. Large 2-quart pot
5. Ferro rod
6. 300 yards of single filament fishing line with 25 assorted hooks
7. Small gauge gill net
8. Bow and 6 arrows
9. Knife
10. Sharpening stone

*****

Joe Robinet

Joe’s interest in the outdoors began at a young age. Most of his childhood years were spent outside building shelters and watching animals. Always determined to improve his understanding of the wild and hone his skills, Joe began to participate in various bush crafting classes, where the skill sets ran from basic foraging and gathering of wild edibles to the more advanced principles of fire construction. His biggest adventure came when he was able to spend several days alone in an igloo in subzero temperatures in Northern Ontario. He’s left behind his wife, his daughter and their dog. Joe’s goal is to last as long as he can on Vancouver Island, but he also knows that this is an opportunity to test his limits, his skills and his spirit, and see just how far he can push himself in the wild.

Here are the ten items Joe selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. 12x 12 tarp
2. 550 paracord – 20m
3. Axe
4. Sleeping bag
5. Large 2-quart pot
6. Ferro rod
7. 300 yards of single filament line with 25 assorted hooks
8. Small gauge gill net
9. Extra emergency rations
10. Large knife

*****

Wayne Russell

Wayne’s love for the outdoors dates back to his childhood, when he and his two older brothers would spend hours in the woods building shelters and learning about wild edibles from their mother. Shelter building soon gave way to hunting, fishing and the art of processing big game. By the time he was 16, Wayne was already pushing himself by venturing out into the woods alone to put his survival skills to the test. Within a short period of time, he was preparing wild meat and spending his nights in self-made brush shelters with minimal gear. Eventually he started on his solo expeditions. Leaving behind his common-law wife, three sons and stepson, Wayne is eager to take on the challenges of surviving in the wilds of Vancouver Island. He sees this as an opportunity to not only share his experience with others, but also as a once in a lifetime opportunity to test the skills he’s been honing since he was a child. He is confident that his knowledge and abilities will pull him through to the end.

Here are the ten items Wayne selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1) 12×12 ground sheet
2) 550 paracord – 20m
3) Saw
4) Axe
5) Sleeping bag
6) large 2 quart pot
7) Ferro rod
8) 300 yards of single filament fishing line and 25 assorted hooks
9) knife
10) Leatherman multi tool

*****

Chris Weatherman

As an author of post-apocalyptic fiction, Chris is a life-long student of survival skills, from urban and suburban settings to far wilder locations. Chris has honed these skills for decades and has spent a considerable amount of time wandering the woods and waters of the Southeast. At home in the swamps of the South and the mountains of Appalachia, he also spent a year in North Carolina, honing his skills foraging, hunting and fishing with primitive methods. After practicing the art of bushcraft for over 20 years, Chris views himself as a mix between a modern day prepper and traditional survivalist. As an avid outdoorsman, traditional bow hunter and archer, Chris also has a vast knowledge of wild edibles and natural medicine that could help anyone survive in the wild. Chris has left behind a wife and three daughters for this experience, and sees the challenge that lies ahead as monumental. Being left alone in the wilderness of northern Vancouver Island with limited equipment is a daunting task for anyone,but he knows that he has the skills to survive.

Here are the ten items Chris selected to bring on his survival journey to Vancouver Island:

1. Saw
2. Axe
3. Sleeping bag
4. Ferro rod
5. Large 2 quart pot
6. Water bottle canteen
7. 300 yards of single filament fishing line with 25 assorted hooks
8. Bow and 6 arrows
9. Knife
10. Sharpening stone

Here was my initial replies:

Quote:I watched the first episode on YT. It looks like they gave them each a big can of bear spray which is actually very effective. I would think that they would be required to give them something from a liability stand point. Even Les Stroud was forced to take a rifle a couple of times by the authorities in the area he was filming.

So yes, I can see it being unnerving to have a couple of bears sniffing around your make-shift shelter. And it was actually pretty cool to see them up in that tree. I knew bears can climb trees, but I've just never pictured them perched up on a branch before. But yeah, this first guy was ready to leave within the first five minutes. Looking at his eyes he was ready to break down crying at any moment. Not trying to be down on him, but he didn't have what it takes emotionally for this type of thing. And with a pregnant wife at home this probably wasn't the wisest of choices. I know he said he was a L.E.O. but I can't imagine him taking the time off to do something like this that could end up being months.

I like the young kid, the 22 year old that was howling at the wolves. He seems to be goofy but having the time of his life. And that's a really good mental attitude to have. You have to enjoy being there. You have to enjoy the beauty around you and keep yourself up mentally and emotionally.

So far it looks to be interesting.


Quote:My son and I have watched the first three episodes. Been enjoying it quite a bit, even my wife was getting into it.

Take home point: DON'T LOOSE YOUR FERRO ROD! [Image: eek.gif]

The guy had a fire going though and could have made the effort to sustain it long term. But just the act of losing this piece of gear put him out of the mind set of survival. And that isn't a good thing. You've got to have a positive attitude regardless of what happens. Maybe this guy was just looking for an excuse (or created one) to go home.

Still liking the 22 year old kid Sam. So far he's got the best attitude.
I couldn't believe the kid tapped out after losing his ferro rod. I realize that his situation was not great, but the fact he already had fire made it doable. I'm not saying I could do what they are doing, but these are supposed to be survivalists.

I'm also a little surprised that they are so afraid of the wildlife. They knew those predators were there and they have bear spray. I'd get a solid staff/spear and have my pepper spray handy. I wouldn't love having a cougar or black bear sniffing around my tent, but I don't think I would tap out unless it was acting aggressively.
I'm really enjoying it. I'm also shocked that people are dropping out so quickly! I think of the gimmick show 'naked and afraid' where people with limited skills last for 21 days in the heat. But what I notice is that most people are breaking due to the psychological stress of the situation and not due to skills issues
(07-11-2015, 04:23 PM)Ronin.45 Wrote: [ -> ]I couldn't believe the kid tapped out after losing his ferro rod. I realize that his situation was not great, but the fact he already had fire made it doable. I'm not saying I could do what they are doing, but these are supposed to be survivalists.

I'm also a little surprised that they are so afraid of the wildlife. They knew those predators were there and they have bear spray. I'd get a solid staff/spear and have my pepper spray handy. I wouldn't love having a cougar or black bear sniffing around my tent, but I don't think I would tap out unless it was acting aggressively.

Yeah, my son and I were talking about these same things.  I guy had a fire going before he lost his ferro rod so why the panic?  Yeah, he lost a valuable piece of gear...but he already had the fire going!  He could have at least made the effort to try to sustain the fire long term.  Doesn't mean you need to keep a bonfire going 24/7 but he could have prepared some char cloth (like the other guy) and had tinder bundles ready to go for when the fire died down but he still had an established bed of coals.  Too be honest, I question if this wasn't 'lost' on purpose as an excuse to tap out?  People on Naked and Afraid get a fire by friction going and keep it going for days if not weeks. 

It just wasn't a valid reason to tap out so quick...unless it was an excuse.

And yeah, some of these folks are freaking out on the wildlife.  It's apparent that they knew where they were being dropped off at (several are quoting the same wildlife stats they flash on the screen).  So they knew there were bears, wolves and big cats.  Making a spear would be on the list of first things to do.  They could do several things for camp security such as natural barriers into the camp i.e. have their back to a large tree, thick brush, log, bank or whatever.  They could position man-made barriers around the camp, set up noise-makers etc as well.  Nothing is 100% of course but some of these guys did NOTHING. 

And they all have bear spray which can be quite effective.  And the latest episode revealed they also have flares if necessary. 

And of course having a decent fire is going to deter all but the most determined wildlife. 

But it is a good show as far as picking up some useful tidbits as well as the 'what not to do' things.  Like keeping your ferro rod in a pocket or something.
(07-11-2015, 06:04 PM)ric0123 Wrote: [ -> ]I'm really enjoying it.  I'm also shocked that people are dropping out so quickly!  I think of the gimmick show 'naked and afraid' where people with limited skills last for 21 days in the heat.    But what I notice is that most people are breaking due to the psychological stress of the situation and not due to skills issues

Yeah, did you see that guy on the last episode the was tripping out?  Said he was seeing flashing lights and symbols or something on the top of his shelter.  Dehydration?  Bad water?  I don't know but he was really flipping that last night.

Maybe having a partner like on Naked and Afraid really helps, though some complete the 21 days when their partner has tapped out or been extracted due to illness/injury.  But it makes you think;  some people can go three weeks with no clothes and one item whereas some can't go three days when fully clothed and (more than) ten items.

I guess that saying is true that the 'will to survive beats the skill to survive'.
"I guess that saying is true that the 'will to survive beats the skill to survive'."

That's why I really like this show. There's no nonsense just straight up survival. From the first episode till last Thursday, you can see clearly what has made some of them stay and some of them go. I think you learn the mental aspect of survival on this show whereas other shows only show you the skills.
The mental aspect is definitely at the forefront in this series. Some of these folks could probably make a cabin and live out there for good if they just had someone to talk to.
I don't get it entirely... Isolation seems to be their biggest enemy. But as you said, they can build a cabin, wikiup shelter, debris hut and use their tarps for keeping firewood dry. Fortify your shelter and build trip alarms for predators. In the mean time put up snares for fish and game. There just seems to be so much that can be done to take your mind off of things.

It just kind of annoys me. I'd love to try this. These guys have the opportunity and some seem to give in (IMO) too easily.
Self reliance is an alien concept to some,others think they can and when they realize it ain't easy they quit.'08.
There are way more people with the knowledge than the ability.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11